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    Amhrán na bhFiann - national anthem (1)   A Soldier's Song - national anthem (2)    A Bucket of the Mountain Dew    A Bunch of Thyme   Admiral William Brown   A Fenian Song    A Little Bit of Heaven    All Around My Hat   A Man You Don't Meet Every Day    A Mothers Love Is A Blessing   A Muirsheen Durkin    A Nation Once Again    And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda    A Night To Remember    An Irishman's Dream    The Armagh Sniper   Arthur McBride    A Stór Mo Chroi     B      Back Home In Derry    Ballyroan   The Bard of Armagh    Barry's Column    Belfast Brigade   Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms    The Birmingham Six   The Black And Tan Gun    Black And Tans    Black Is the Colour    Black Velvet Band    The Bold Black And Tan    The Bold Fenian Men    The Bold O'Donohue    Bold Robert Emmet    Bold Tenant Farmer   Bonnie Kellswater    Boolavogue (1)    Boolavogue (2)   Botany Bay    The Boys From the County Armagh   The Boys From the County Cork   The Boys From the County Mayo   Boys of Fairhill   The Boys of Kilkenny    The Boys of Killybegs   Boys of Kilmichael    Boys of the Old Brigade    Bread And Fishes   Brennan On the Moor    Bridgit O'Malley    Bring Them Home   Broad Black Brimmer    Buachaill Ón Éirne      C      Carrickfergus (1)    Carrickfergus (2)    The Cliffs of Doneen    Cockles And Mussels (Molly Malone)    Comical Genius   Courtin' In the Kitchen    The Crack Was Ninety In the Isle of Man    The Creggan White Hare   The Croppy Boy    The Curragh of Kildare      D      Danny Boy    The Dawning of the Day    Dear Boss (The Sick Note)    The Dear Little Shamrock   Death Of Schomberg   The Decommissioning Song   Derry's Deathless Story   De Valera   The Devil And Bailiff McGlynn   Dicey Reilly    Did Your Mother Come From Ireland   Dingle Bay   Dirty Old Town    Down By the Glenside    Down By the Salley Gardens    Do You Want Your Old Lobby Washed Down    Dublin Jack of All Trades      E      Easy And Slow    Eileen Aroon    Erin Go Bragh      F      The Fair At Turloughmore    Fairytale of New York    Fare Thee Well Enniskillen (1)    Fare Thee Well Enniskillen (2)   Farewell To Dublin In My Tears   The Fenian Record Player   The Fenians' Escape    Fiddlers Green    The Fields of Athenry    Finnegan's Wake    Flight of Earls    Flower of Sweet Strabane    The Foggy Dew    Follow Me Up To Carlow    Forty Shades of Green    For What Died the Sons of Róisin   Four Green Fields    Freedom Sons   Free The People   From Clare to Here (1)   From Clare to Here (2)     G      Gallipoli   Galway Bay    Galway Farmer    The Galway Races (1)    The Galway Races (2)   The Galway Races (3)   Gardai 'N Rí   The Garden Where the Praties Grow   Garryowen    Give Me Your Hand   God Bless England    God Save Ireland    Goodbye Mick   The Green Fields of France      H      Hills of Connemara    How Are Things In Glocca Morra      I      If I Was A Blackbird    If You're Irish...    I'll Take You Home Again Kathleen    I'll Tell Me Ma    I.R.E.L.A.N.D.    The Irish Emigrant    The Irish Free State   The Irish Mail Robber   The Irish Rover (1)    The Irish Rover (2)    Irish Soldier Boy    Irish Soldier Laddie    Irish Ways And Irish Laws   Isle of Hope, Isle of Tears   Isle of Inishfree   It Was Pretty To Be In Ballinderry      J      James Connolly    Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier (Shule Agra)    Johnny Be Fair    Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye    Johnson's Motor Car    The Jolly Beggarman    Jug of Punch    Just Give Me Your Hand      K      Kathleen Mavourneen    Kelly of Killane    The Kerry Dance    The Kerry Recruit    Kevin Barry      L      Lakes of Coolfin   Lakes of Pontchartrain    The Langer    Lanigan's Ball    The Lark In the Clear Air    Lark In the Morning    The Lass of Aughrim   The Leaving of Liverpool (1)    The Leaving of Liverpool (2)    The Legion of the Rearguard    Limerick You're A Lady   Little Grey Home In the West   Lord Nelson    Lord of the Dance      M      MacNamara's Band    Macushla   The Maid Who Sold Her Barley    Maids When You're Young    The Man From the Daily Mail    Many Young Men of Twenty   Mc Alpine's Fusiliers    The Meeting of the Waters    The Men Behind the Wire    The Men of the West    The Merry Ploughboy    Michael Collins    The Minstrel Boy    Mo Ghile Mear    Molly Malone (Cockles And Mussels)    The Mountain Tay    Mountains of Mourne    My Uncle Is In the Dáil      N      Nell Flaherty's Drake    Nelson's Farewell    No Irish Need Apply      O      O'Donnell Abu    Old Fenian Gun   The Old Man   Only Our Rivers Run Free    On Midsummer Day    On the One Road    The Ould Woman From Wexford   Our Lads In Crumlin Jail     P      Paddy McGinty's Goat    Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore (1)    Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore (2)   Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore (3)   Paddy's Lamentation   Padraig Pearse   The Parting Glass    Patrick Street   The Patriot Game    Peggy Gordon    Peggy Lettermore (1)   Peggy Lettermore (2)   The Peoples Own M.P.   Pick Up Your Rifle   Poor Paddy On the Railway    Preab San Ol   Pretty Little Girl From Omagh     Q      Queen of Connemara     R      Raglan Road    The Rare Oul' Times    Red Is the Rose    Reilly's Daughter (1)    Reilly's Daughter (2)    The Reluctant Patriot    The Rifles of the I.R.A.    The Rising of the Moon (1)    The Rising of the Moon (2)    Roads of Kildare   Rocky Road To Dublin    Roddy McCorley    Róisin Dubh   The Rose of Mooncoin    The Rose of Tralee    Rosin the Beau      S      The Sea Around Us    Sean South of Garryowen    Seven Drunken Nights (1)    Seven Drunken Nights (2)   The Shores of Amerikay    Shule Agra (Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier)    The Sick Note (Dear Boss)    Skibbereen (1)    Skibbereen (2)    Slane (Be Thou My Vision)    Slievenamon   The Snowy Breasted Pearl    Spancil Hill    The Spanish Lady    The Spinning Wheel    Star of the County Down (1)    Star of the County Down (2)    Step It Out Mary    The Stone Outside Dan Murphy's Door   The Streets of New York   Sullivan's John    Summer In Dublin     T      Take Her Up To Monto (1)   Take Her Up To Monto (2)   Tara's Harp    They Never Came Home (Stardust Song)    The Thirty-Two Counties    This Land Is Your Land (1)   This Land Is Your Land (2)   This Land Is Your Land (3)   Three Leaf Shamrock   The Tinker   The Town I Loved So Well    Tri-Coloured Ribbon   'T Was Pretty To Be In Ballinderry      V      The Valley of Knockanure      W      Waxies Dargle    The Wearing of the Green    Weila Waila    The West's Awake    The Wexford Carol   When Irish Eyes Are Smiling    When You Were Sweet Sixteen   Where the River Shannon Flows   Where the Three Counties Meet   Whiskey In the Jar (1)    Whiskey In the Jar (2)    Whiskey You're the Devil    Whistling Gypsy    The Wild Colonial Boy    The Wild Rover    Will You Come To the Bower    The Winds Are Singing Freedom    The Wind That Shakes the Barley      Z      Zoological Gardens   


Top of page

GALLIPOLI
(Swan/Doyle)

I remember the day it stands clear in my mind
We went down to Dun Laoighaire to wave you goodbye
Your ma was quietly weeping, there was a tear in my eye
your sailing to Gallipoli to die

You looked so young as you stood there with a glint in your eye
and you sang rebel songs as the streamers flew high
Your ma she turned away and I heard her sigh
you are sailing to Gallipoli to die

Chorus:
You were all that we had, your mammy and me
when you marched head erect you were proud as could be
but it killed your poor ma and it slowly killing me
when you were blown to kingdom come on the shores of Gallipoli

We got only one letter we knew right away
It said deepest regrets your son was bold and he was brave
you were only 19 yet your mammy and I let you sail to Gallipoli to die

Chorus

You fought for the wrong country you fought for the wrong cause
and your ma often said that it was Ireland's great loss
all those fine young men who marched to foreign shores to fight the war
when the greatest war of all was at home

Chorus



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GALWAY BAY

If you ever go across the sea to Ireland
Then maybe at the closing of your day
You will sit and watch the moon rise over Claddagh
And see the sun go down on Galway Bay

Just to hear again the ripple of the trout stream
The women in the meadows making hay
And to sit beside a turf fire in the cabin
And watch the barefoot gosoons at their play

For the breezes blowing over the seas from Ireland
Are perfumed by the heather as it blows
And the women in the uplands diggin' praties
Speak a language that the strangers do not know

For the strangers came and tried to teach us their way
They scorn'd us just for being what we are
But they might as well go chasing after moonbeams
Or light a penny candle from a star

And if there is going to be a life hereafter
And somehow I am sure there's going to be
I well ask my God to let me make my heaven
In that dear land across the Irish sea



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GALWAY FARMER

[Song written in 1992 by Steve Knightley from the group Show of Hands]

I worked my days on a Galway Farm
In the sun and rain and wind and storm
But once a year I'll chance my arm
And cross the sea to England
I'll scrimp and save 2000 pounds
Spend the week in Cheltenham town
But the racing over always down
I come back poor from England

I dreamed one night before I left
A coal black mare with a white star chest
Crossed the line and beat the rest
I came back rich to Galway
I rose at dawn and drove all day
Thinking, wondering all the way
Lady luck have you come to stay
Or steal away in the morning

When I got to Cheltenham town
Irish faces all around 
No bed or mattress to be found
I slept out on the hillside
I spent three days at the viewing ring
Saw the horses they led in
And just as I was giving in
I stood and stared in wonder

With stamping hooves and steaming breath
A coal black mare with a white star chest
I ran my finger down the list
I matched the name and number
Well Lady Luck had come half way
The horses name was Galway Bay
20-1 were the odds that day
I went to make my wager

I counted out 2000 pounds
Held it high, slapped it down
The bookie smiled but made no sound
I knew what he was thinking
The biggest loser in all the land
With pounding heart and shaking hands
I made my way up to the stand
The horses came to order

But at the first she nearly fell
I cursed my farmers luck to hell
The second and third she took quite well
Way behind the leaders
Then moving swiftly from the back
Found the rails and caught the pack
Ten to go and from the back
Her hooves were drumming thunder

She’s catching horses one by one
Bridle flashing in the sun
Eight to go and a mile to run
Two are left before her
Down the straight and on they sped
Left one at the last for dead
Caught the next and by a head
She came home a winner

So I came back to my Galway farm
A wiser and a richer man
But never again I'll chance my arm
Or cross the sea to England
'Cos Lady Luck was mine that day
I held her close and she went my way
I raised a glass to the Galway Bay
And the dream of the Galway farmer



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THE GALWAY RACES (1)

As I rode down to Galway town to seek for recreation
On the seventeenth of August me mind being elevated
There were multitudes assembled with their tickets at the station
Me eyes began to dazzle and I'm goin' to see the races

Chorus:
With your whack-fa-the-da-for-the-diddle-ee-iddle-day

There were passengers from Limerick and passengers from Nenagh
And passengers from Dublin and sportsmen from Tipperary
There were passengers from Kerry, and all quarters of our nation
And our member, Mr. Hearst, for to join the Galway Blazers

There were multitudes from Aran, and members from New Quay shore
Boys from Connemara and the Clare unmarried maidens
There were people from Cork city, who were loyal, true and faithful
Who brought home the Fenian prisoners from diverse foreign nations

It's there you'll see confectioners with sugarsticks and dainties
The lozenges and oranges, the lemonade and raisins!
The gingerbread and spices to accomodate the ladies
And a big crubeen for thruppence to be pickin' while you're able

It's there you'll see the gamblers, the thimbles and the garters
And the spotting Wheel of Fortune with the four and twenty quarters
There was others without scruple pelting wattles at poor Maggy
And her father well-contented and he lookin' at his daughter

It's there you'll see the pipers and the fiddlers competing
The nimble footed dancers a-tripping over the daisies
There were others crying cigars and lights and bills for all the races
With the colors of the jockeys and the prize and horses' ages

It's there you'll see the jockeys and they're mounted out so stately
The pink, the blue, the orange, and green, the emblem of our nation
When the bell was rung for starting, all the horses seemed impatient
I thought they never stood on ground their speed was so amazing

There was half a million people there from all denominations
The Catholic, the Protestant, the Jew, and Presbyterian
There was yet no animosity, no matter what persuasion
But "failte" and hospitality inducin' fresh acquaintance



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THE GALWAY RACES (2)

As I rode down to Galway Town to seek for recreation
On the seventeen of August me mind being elevated
There were multitudes assembled with their tickets at the station
And me eyes beggan to dazzle and they off to see the races
With me wack fol the do fol the diddle idle day

There were passengers from Limerick and passengers from Nenagh
The boys of Connemara and the Clare unmarried maiden
There were people from Cork City who were loyal, true and faithful
Who brought home the Fenian prisoners from dying in foreign nations
With me wack fol the do fol the diddle idle day

And it's there you see the pipers and the fiddlers competing
And the sporting wheel of fortune and the four and twenty quaters
And there's others without scruple pelting wattles at poor Maggie
And her father well contented and he gazing at his daughter
With me wack fol the do fol the diddle idle day

And it's there you see the jockeys and they mounted on so stably
The pink, the blue, the orange, and green the colours of our nation
When the bell was rung for starting all the horses seemed impatient
Their feet they hardly touched the ground the speed was so amazing!
With me wack fol the do fol the diddle idle day

There was half a million people there of all denominations
The Catholic, the Protestant, the Jew the Presbyterian
There was yet no animosity no matter what persuasion
But failte hospitality Inducing fresh acquaintance
With me wack fol the do fol the diddle idle day



Top of page

THE GALWAY RACES (3)

As I rode down to Galway Town to seek for recreation
On the seventeenth of August, me mind being elevated
There were multitudes assembled with their tickets at the station
Me eyes began to dazzle and I'm going to see the races
With me whack fol-da-da, fol-da-diddly-ida-day

There were passengers from Limerick and more from Tipperary
Boys from Connemara and the flair of married ladies
People from Cork City who were loyal, true and faithful
Who brought home the Fenian prisoners from dying in foreign nations
With me whack fol-da-da, fol-da-diddly-ida-day

It's there you'll see the jockeys and they're mounted out so stately
The pink, the blue, the orange and green, the emblem of our Nation
When the bell was rung for starting, all the horses seemed impatient
I thought they never stood on groung, their speed was so amazing
With me whack fol-da-da, fol-da-diddly-ida-day

There was half a million people there from all denominations
The Catholic, the Protestant, the Jew and Presbyterian
There was yet no animosity, no matter what persuasion
But sportsman hospitality and induce fresh aquaintance
With me whack fol-da-da, fol-da-diddly-ida-day



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GÁRDAI 'N RÍ
(The King's Own Guards)

Rachaidh mise suas le Gárdaí 'n Rí
Agus bhéarfaidh mis' anuas ar láimh liom í
Nach mise chuirfeadh cluain ar a báin-chnios mín
Agus bhéarfadidh mé go Tuaifín í grá mo chroí
Tógaigí suas ar ghruaidh-mhín an iomair' í
Lasadh ina gruaidh agus buaidh gach duine léi
'Ghiolla 'tá gan gruaim a chuirfeadh cluain ar an iomataí
Nach é mo scéal truaighe mar luaidheadh mise leat

Níl mise tinn agus níl mé slán
Is ró-mhór m'osna is ní fhéadaim a rá
Nuair a smuaintím ar an uair úd a bhí mé is tú, 'ghrá
Guala ar ghualainn agus lámh ar láimh

Galar claoite 'choíche 'n grá
'S mairg ar a mbíonn sé oíche ná lá
Gidh gur cruaidh 'n rud a' snaidhm 's nach scaoiltear é go bráth
O is, a chomrádaí díleas, go dté tú slán



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THE GARDEN WHERE THE PRATIES GROW

Have you ever been in love, me boys?
Oh! have you felt the pain?
I'd rather be in jail, me boys/myself
Than be in love again
For the girl I loved was beautiful
I'd have you all to know
And I met her in the garden
Where the praties grow

Chorus:
She was just the sort of creature, boys
That nature did intend
To walk right through the world, me boys
Without a Grecian Bend
Nor did she wear a chignon
I'd have you all to know
And I met her in the garden
Where the praties grow

Said I, "My pretty/lovely colleen
I hope you'll pardon me/hope that you agree"
And she wasn't like the city girls
Who'd say "You're making free"
She looked at me right modestly/honestly
And curtsied very low
"Sure, you're welcome in the garden
Where the praties grow"

Chorus

Says I, "My lovely darling/pretty Colleen
I'm tired of single life
And if you've no objections
I will make you my sweet wife."
Says she, "I'll ask my parents
And tomorrow I'll let you know
If you'll meet me in the garden/
and i mmet you in the garden
Where the praties grow"

Chorus

Her parents they consented
And we're blessed with children three:
Two girls just like their mother
And a boy the image of me
We'll train them up in decency
The way they ought to go
And we'll send them to the garden
Where the praties grow

Chorus



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GARRYOWEN

[Garryowen is known to have been used by Irish regiments as a drinking song. The name is
derived from Gaelic meaning Owen's garden, and is nowadays part of Limerick city.
That was where the 5th Royal Irish Lancers made their home, and soon the song became
associated with the Lancers' drinking. The Irish poet Thomas Moore wrote the words around
1807. The tune is first documented as Auld Bessy in 1788.
General George Armstrong Custer reportedly heard the song among his Irish troops and liked
it. Lieutenant Colonel (Captain) Myles W. Keogh and several other officers with ties to the
Fifth Royal Irish Lancers and the Papal Guard, two Irish regiments in the British Army,
were believed to be instrumental in bringing the air to the regiment. The tune was then
played so often the 7th Cavalry became tied to it. In 1867 it was adopted as the official
marching song of the Seventh Cavalry. It was the last song played for Custer's men as they
left general Alfred Terry's column at the Powder River and rode into history by being
defeated by the warriors of the Lakota, Cheyenne and Arapaho nations on the morning of
25th June 1876 at the Battle of Little Bighorn]

Let Bacchus' sons be not dismayed
But join with me each jovial blade
Come booze and sing and lend your aid
To help me with the chorus

Chorus:
Instead of spa we'll drink brown ale
And pay the reckoning on the nail
For debt no man shall go to gaol (jail)
From Garryowen in glory

We are the boys that take delight in
Smashing the Limerick lamps when lighting
Through the street like sportsters fighting
And tearing all before us

We'll break the windows, we'll break the doors
The watch knock down by threes and fours
Then let the doctors work their cures
And tinker up our bruised

We'll beat the bailiffs out of fun
We'll make the mayor and sheriffs run
We are the boys no man dares dun
If he regards a whole skin

Our hearts so stout have got us fame
For soon 'tis known from whence we came
Where'er we go they dread the name
Of Garryowen in glory

Johnny Connell's tall and straight
And in his limbs he is complete
He'll pitch a bar of any weight
From Garryowen to Thomondgate

Garryowen is gone to rack
Since Johnny Connell went to Cork
Though Darby O'Brien leapt over the dock
In spite of judge and jury



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GIVE ME YOUR HAND
(Tabhair dom do lámh)

Just give me your hand
Tabhair dom do lámh
Just give me your hand
And I'll walk with you
Through the streets of our land
Through the mountains so grand
If you give me your hand
Just give me your hand
And come along with me
Will you give me your hand
And the world it can see
That we can be free
In peace and harmony?
From the north to the south
From the east to the west
Every mountain, every valley
Every bush and birds nest!

Just give me your hand
Tabhair dom do lámh
Just give me your hand
For the world it is ours
All the sea and the land
To destroy or command
If you give me your hand
Just give me your hand
In a gesture of peace
Will you give me your hand
And all troubles will cease
For the strong and the weak
For the rich and the poor?
All peoples and creeds
Let's meet their needs
With a passion, we can fashion
A new world of love!

Chorus:
By day and night
Through all struggle and strife
And beside you, to guide you
Forever, my love
For love's not for one
But for both of us to share
For our country so fair
For our world and what's there



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GOD BLESS ENGLAND 
(Peadar Kearney)

I'll sing you a song of peace and love
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
To the land that reigns all lands above
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
May peace and plenty be her share
Who kept our homes from want and care
God bless England is our prayer
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day

Chorus:
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
So we say, Hip Hooray!
Come and listen while we pray
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day

When we were savage, fierce and wild
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
England came as mother to  child
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
She gently raised us from the slime
Stopped our drinking and our crime
And sent us to Heaven in her own good time
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day

Chorus

Now our fathers oft were naughty boys
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
For guns and pikes are dangerous toys
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
From Bearna Baol to Bunker Hill
They made poor England cry  her fill
But ould Brittania loves us still!
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day

Chorus

Now Irishmen, forget the past!
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
And think of the time that's coming fast
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day
When we shall all be civilized
Neat and clean and well-advised
Won't Mother England be surprised?
Whack fol the diddle all the di do day

Chorus



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GOD SAVE IRELAND
(T. D. Sullivan)

High upon the gallows tree swung the noble-hearted Three
By the vengeful tyrant stricken in their bloom
But they met him face to face, with the courage of their race
And they went with souls undaunted to their doom

Chorus:
"God save Ireland!" said the heroes
"God save Ireland" said they all
"Whether on the scaffold high
Or the battlefield we die
0, what matter when for Erin dear we fall!"

Girt around with cruel foes, still their courage proudly rose
For they thought of hearts that loved them for and near
Of the millions true and brave o'er the ocean's swelling wave
And the friends in holy Ireland ever dear

Chorus

Climbed they up the rugged stair, rang their voices out in prayer
Then with England's fatal cord around them cast
Close beside the gallows tree kissed like brothers lovingly
True to home and faith and freedom to the last

Chorus 

Never till the latest day shall the memory pass away
Of the gallant lives thus given for our land
But on the cause must go, amidst joy and weal and woe
Till we make our Isle a nation free and grand

Chorus



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GOODBYE MICK

The ship it sails in half an hour to cross the broad Atlantic
My friends are standing on the quay with grief and sorrow frantic
I'm just about to sail away in the good ship Dan O'Leary
The anchor's weighed and the gangway's up, I'm leaving Tipperary

Chorus:
And it's goodbye Mick and goodbye Pat and goodbye Kate and Mary
The anchor's weighed and the gangway's up, I'm leaving Tipperary
And now the steam is blowing off, I have no more to say
I'm bound for New York City boys, three thousand miles away

In my portmanteau here I have some cabbage, beans and bacon
And if you think I can't eat that, well, there's where yer mistaken
For this ship will play with pitch and toss for half a dozen farthings
I'll roll me bundle on me back and walk to Castle gardens

Now I won't come that Yankee chat, I guess I'm calculatin'
Come liquor up old sonny boy, when an old friend I am treatin'
I'm deep in love with Molly Burke like an ass is fond of clover
I'll send for her when I get there - that's if she will come over

Then fare thee well old Erin dear, to part me heart does ache well
From Carrickfergus to Cape Clear - I'll never see your equal
Although to foreign parts we're bound where cannibals may eat us
We'll ne'er forget the Holy Ground of poteen and potatoes

When good St Paddy banished snakes he shook them from his garment
He never thought we'd go abroad to look upon such vermint
Nor quit this land where whiskey grew to wear the Yankee button
Take vinegar for mountain dew and toads for mountain mutton



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THE GREEN FIELDS OF FRANCE
(Written by Eric Bogle)
[Originally called "No Man's Land", it is also known as "Willie McBride"
Visit Eric Bogle's official homepage]

Well how do you do, young Willie McBride
Do you mind if I sit here down by your graveside
And rest for a while 'neath the warm summer sun
I've been walking all day and I'm nearly done
I see by your gravestone you were only nineteen
When you joined the great call-up in nineteen-sixteen
I hope you died well and I hope you died clean
Or Willie McBride, was it slow and obscene

Chorus:
Did they beat the drum slowly, did they play the fife lowly
Did they sound the dead march as they lowered you down?
And did the band play the 'Last post' and chorus?
Did the pipes play the 'Flowers of the forest'?

Did you leave a wife or a sweetheart behind
In some faithful heart is your memory enshrined?
Although you died back in nineteen sixteen
In that faithful heart are you forever nineteen?
Or are you a stranger without even a name
Enclosed and forever behind the glass frame
In a old photograph, torn and battered and stained
And faded to yellow in a brown leather frame?

Chorus

The sun now it shines on the green fields of France
There's a warm summer breeze, makes the red poppies dance
And look how the sun shines from under the clouds
There's no gas, no barbed wire, there's no guns firing now
But here in this graveyard it's still no-man's land
The countless white crosses stand mute in the sand
To man's blind indifference to his fellow man
To a whole generation that were butchered and damned

Chorus

Now young Willie McBride I can't help wonder why
Do those who lie here know why did they die?
And did they believe when they answered the call
Did they really believe that this war would end wars?
For the sorrow, the suffering, the glory, the pain
The killing, the dying was all done in vain
For young Willie McBride, it all happened again
And again, and again, and again, and again

Chorus



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HILLS OF CONNEMARA

Chorus:
Gather up the pots and the old tin cans
The mash, the corn, the barley and the bran
Run like the devil from the excise man
Keep the smoke from rising, Barney

Keep your eyes well peeled today
The excise men are on their way
Searching for the mountain tay
In the hills of Connemara

Swinging to the left, swinging to the right
The excise men will dance all night
Drinkin' up the tay till the broad daylight
In the hills of Connemara

Chorus

A gallon for the butcher and a quart for John
And a bottle for poor old Father Tom
Just to help the poor old dear along
In the hills of Connemara

Stand your ground, for it's too late
The excise men are at the gate
Glory be to Paddy, but they're drinkin' it straight
In the hills of Connemara

Chorus twice


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HOW ARE THINGS IN GLOCCA MORRA

How are things in Glocca Morra?
Is that little brook still leaping there?
Does it still run down to Donny-cove?
Through Killybegs, Kilkerry and Kildare?

How are things in Glocca Morra?
Is that willow tree still weeping there?
Does that laddie with the twinklin' eye
Come whistlin' by and does he walk away
Sad and dreamy there not to see me there?
So I ask each weepin' willow
And each brook along the way
And each lad that comes a'whistlin'
Too-ra-lay
How are things in Glocca Morra
This fine day?



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IF I WAS A BLACKBIRD

I am a young maiden, my story is sad
For once I was courted by a brave sailin' lad
He courted me strongly, by night and by day
Oh, but now he has left me, and sailed far away

Chorus:
And if I was a blackbird I'd whistle and sing
And I'd follow the vessel my true love sails in
And on the top riggin' I would there build my nest
And I'd flutter my wings o'er his lily white breast

Chorus

Well, he promised to take me to Donnybrook Fair
And to buy me red ribbons for to tie up my hair
And when he'd come home from the ocean so wide
He would take me, and make me, his own bonny bride

Chorus

Now his parents they slight me, and will not agree
That me and my sailor boy married will be
But when he comes home, I will greet him with joy
And I'll take to my heart my dear sailor boy

Chorus



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IF YOU'RE IRISH...

In sweet Lim'rick Town, they say
Lived a chap named Patrick John Molloy
Once he sailed to the U.S.A.
His luck in foreign parts he thought he'd try
Now he's made his name, and is a wealthy man
He put a bit away for a rainy day
So if you gaze upon
The house of Patrick John
You'll find a notice that goes on to say:

Chorus:
If you're Irish come into the parlour
There's a welcome there for you
If your name is Timothy or Pat
So long as you come from Ireland
There's a welcome on the mat
If You come from the Mountains of Mourne
Or Killarney's lakes so blue
We'll sing you a song and we'll make a fuss
Whoever you are you are one of us
If you're Irish, this is the place for you

Patrick loved the girl he wed
But he could not stand his Ma-n-aw
Once with joy he turned quite red
When she got into trouble thro' her jaw
Six police they had to take her to the Court
She was informed a month she would have to do
So Patrick quickly wrote
Up to the Judge a note
Explaining, "Sir, I'm much obliged to you!"



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I'LL TAKE YOU HOME AGAIN KATHLEEN
[This song was written in 1875 by Thomas Westendorf,
a public school music teacher in Plainfield, Illinois, USA. The first
public  performance of the tune was in Plainfield's town
hall. He wrote the tune for his wife Jeanie, while she was visiting
her home town of Ogdensburg, New York. In 1876 the tune was one of two
most popular songs in America - the other being Grandfather's Clock.]

I'll take you home again, Kathleen
Across the ocean wild and wide
To where your heart has ever been
Since you were first my bonnie bride
The roses all have left your cheek
I've watched them fade away and die
Your voice is sad when e'er you speak
And tears bedim your loving eyes

Chorus:
Oh! I will take you back, Kathleen
To where your heart will feel no pain
And when the fields are fresh and green
I'll take you to your home again!

I know you love me, Kathleen, dear
Your heart was ever fond and true
I always feel when you are near
That life holds nothing, dear, but you
The smiles that once you gave to me
I scarcely ever see them now
Though many, many times I see
A dark'ning shadow on your brow

Chorus

To that dear home beyond the sea
My Kathleen shall again return
And when thy old friends welcome thee
Thy loving heart will cease to yearn
Where laughs the little silver stream
Beside your mother's humble cot
And brightest rays of sunshine gleam
There all your grief will be forgot

Chorus



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I'LL TELL ME MA

I'll tell me ma when I go home
The boys won't leave the girls alone
They pulled my hair and they stole my comb
Well that's all right till I go home

  She is handsome, she is pretty
  She is the belle of Belfast City
  She is counting..one, two, three!
  Please won't you tell me, who is she

Albert Mooney says he loves her
All the boys are fighting for her
They knock at the door and they ring at the bell
Sayin', "Oh my true love, are you well?"
Out she comes as white as snow
Rings on her fingers, bells on her toes
Old Johnny Murray says she'll die
If she doesn't get the fellow with the rovin' eye

Let the wind and the rain and the hail blow high
And the snow come tumblin' from the sky
She's as nice as apple pie,
She'll get her own lad by and by
When she gets a lad of her own
She won't tell her ma when she comes home
Let them all come as they will
For it's Albert Mooney she loves still



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I.R.E.L.A.N.D.

Come all ye lads and lassies and sit you down with me
And I will tell the truth about a land that's dear to me
You've read it in the papers and you've seen it on TV
But I will spell it out for you, what Ireland means to me

Chorus:
I is for internment of the innocent and free
R is for resistance to the laws of tyranny
E is for the English who have torn our land apart
L is for the love of freedom in every Irish heart
A is for the answer we're all searching for
N is for one nation and an end to this long war
D is for the dream of millions longing to be free
That's how I spell Ireland, that`s what Ireland means to me

This land was once respected for its saints and scholars too
But now the bomb and bullet that's all that makes the news
I know that it's confusing and it's hard to understand
But I will spell it out for you by spelling Ireland

Repeat chorus



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THE IRISH EMIGRANT

I'm sitting on the stile, Mary, where we once sat side by side
On a bright May morning long ago, when first you were my bride
The corn was springing fresh and green, and the lark sang loud and high
And the red was on your lips, Mary, and the love light in your eyes

Tis but a step down yonder lane, the village Church stands near
The place where we were wed, Mary, I can see the spire from here
But the graveyard lies between, Mary, and my step might break your rest
Where I laid you darling down to sleep with a baby on your breast

I'm very lonely now, Mary, for the poor make no new friends
But oh they love the better still the few our Father sends
For you were all I had, Mary, my blessing and my pride
And I've nothing left to care for now since my poor Mary died

Yours was the good brave heart, Mary, that still kept hoping on
When the trust in God had left my soul and my arms young strength had gone
There was comfort ever on your lip and a kind look on your brow
And I thank you Mary for the same though you cannot hear me now

I'm bidding you a long farewell, my Mary kind and true
But I'll not forget you, darling, in the land I'm going to
They say there's bread and work for all, and the sun shines always there
But I'll ne'er forget old Ireland, were it fifty times as fair

And often in those grand old woods I'll sit and shut my eyes
And my heart will wander back again to the place where Mary lies
And I think I'll see that little stile where we sat side by side
In the springing corn and the bright May morn' when first you were my bride



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THE IRISH FREE STATE

I went to see David, to London to David
I went to see David, and what did he do?
He gave me a Free State, a nice little Free State
A Free State that's bound up with Red, White and Blue
I brought it to Dublin to show to Dail Eirann
I brought it to Dublin, and what did they do?
 They asked me what kind of a thing was a Free State
A Free State that's tied up  with Red, White and Blue

"Three quarters of Ireland a nation," I told them
"Tied on to the Empire with Red, White and Blue;
And an oath they must swear to King George and Queen Mary
An oath they must swear to the son-in-law new
I'm teaching them Irishand painting their boxes
All over with green, sure, what more can I do?
Yet they tell me they want just an Irish Republic
Without any trimmings of Red, White and Blue!



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THE IRISH MAIL ROBBER

It's adieu to old Ireland, the place where I was born
Near the county of Limerick, near the state of Glengall;
Far away to some island, bound down like a slave
It was in my own country I did misbehave

It was my old father who did caution me
To leave off night walking, shun bad company;
 Saying, "Son, you are young and they'll lead you astray
You will think of these words when I'm cold in the clay"

But to all his good advices I never gave care
And still I went on with my wicked career;
'Twas drinking and gambling by night and by day
To maintain those rude "wimming" and dress them up gay

I had not been long in this wicked career
Before I was taken by the laws of the land;
Was tried and found guilty of a mail robbery
And for ages transported across the salt sea

'Tis now I'm safe landed on my own native shore
and looking around me I can see my cell door;
And looking around me I can see my cell door
Which causes me to think of my mother once more

Oft times I have wondered why "wimming" love men
More times I have wondered why men should love them;
They lead you to ruin and cause your downfall
They'll cause you to sleep behind cold prison walls



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THE IRISH ROVER (1)

In the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred and six
we set sail from the coal quay of Cork
We were bound far away with a cargo of bricks
for the fine city hall of New York
In a very fine craft, she was rigged fore-and-aft
and oh, how the wild winds drove her
She had twenty-three masts and withstood several blasts
and we called her the Irish Rover

There was Barney McGee from the banks of the Lee
there was Hogan from County Tyrone
And Johnny  McGurk who was scared stiff of work
and a chap from West Meath called Malone
There was Slugger O'Toole who was drunk as a rule
and fighting Bill Casey from Dover
There was Dooley from Claire who was strong as a bear
and was skipper of the Irish Rover

We had one million bales of old nanny goats' tails
we had two million barrels of stones
We had three million sides of old blind horses hides
we had four million packets of bones
We had five million hogs, and six million dogs
and seven million barrels of porter
We had eight million bags of the best Sligo rags
in the hold of the Irish Rover

We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out
and the ship lost her way in a fog (BIG FOG!)
And the whole of the crew was reduced down to two
'Twas myself and the captain's old dog
Then the ship struck a rock, Oh Lord what a shock
and then she heeled right over
Turned nine times around, and the poor dog was drowned
I'm the last of the Irish Rover



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THE IRISH ROVER (2)

In the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred and three
set sail from the County of Cork
We were sailing away with a cargo of bricks
for the grand city hall in New York
We had an elegant craft, it was rigged 'fore and 'aft
And how the trade winds drove her
she had twenty three masts and she stood several blasts
And they called her the Irish Rover

There was Barney Magree from the banks of the Lee
there was Hogan from County Tyrone
There was Johnny McGurk, who was scared stiff of work
and a chap from WestMeath named Malone
There was Slugger O'Toole, who was drunk as a rule
and fighting Bill Tracy that drove her
And your man Mick McCann from the banks of the Bann
was the skipper of the Irish Rover

We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags
we had two million barrels of bone
We had three million bales of old nanny goats' tails
we had four million barrels of stone
We had five million hogs and six million dogs
and seven million barrels of porter
We had eight million sides of old blind horses hides
in the hold of the Irish Rover

We had sailed seven years, when the measles broke out
and our ship lost her way in a fog
And the whole of the crew was reduced down to two
'Twas myself and the captain's old dog
Then the ship struck a rock. O Lord, what a shock
and nearly tumbled over
Turned nine times around, then the poor old dog was drowned
I'm the last of the Irish Rover



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IRISH SOLDIER BOY

At a cottage door one winters' night
as the snow lay on the ground
Stood a youthful Irish soldier boy
to the mountains he was bound
His mother stood beside him saying
you'll win my boy don't fear
With loving arms around his waist
she tied his bandolier

Good bye, God bless you mother dear
I hope your heart won't pain
But pray to God that you should see
your soldier boy again
And when I'm out in the firing line
it will be a source of joy
For you to know that you're remembering still
your Irish soldier boy

And when the fighting it was o'er
and the flag of truce was raised
The leaders ordered fire to cease
all Ireland stood amazed
His comrades came to the cottage door
with a note from her pride and joy
With an aching heart she cried God be good
to her Irish soldier boy

Goodbye, God bless you mother dear
I'm dying a death so grand
From wounds received in action
trying to free my native land
I hope we'll meet in heaven above
in that land beyond the sky
Where you'll always be in company
with Your Irish Soldier boy



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IRISH SOLDIER LADDIE

'Twas a morning in July, I was walking to Tipperary
When I heard a battle cry from the mountains over head
As I looked up in the sky I saw an Irish soldier laddie
He looked at me right fearlessly and said:

Chorus:
Will ye stand in the band like a true Irish man
And go and fight the forces of the crown?
Will ye march with O'Neill to an Irish battle field?
For tonight we go to free old Wexford town!

Said I to that soldier boy,
"Won't you take me to your captain
T'would be my pride and joy for to march with you today
My young brother fell in Cork and my son at Innes Carthay!"
Unto the noble captain I did say:

As we marched back from the field in the shadow of the evening
With our banners flying low to the memory of our dead
We returned unto our homes but without my soldier laddie
Yet I never will forget those words he said:



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IRISH WAYS AND IRISH LAWS

Once upon a time there was
Irish ways and Irish laws
Villages of Irish blood
Waking in the morning
Waking in the morning

Then the Vikings came around
Turned us up and turned us down
Started building boats and towns
They tried to change our living
They tried to change our living

Cromwell and his soldiers came
Started centuries of shame
But they could not make us turn
We are a river flowing
We're a river flowing

Again, again the soldiers came
Burnt our houses, stole our grain
Shot the farmers in their fields
Working for a living
Working for a living

Eight hundred years we have been down
The secret of the water sound
Has kept the spirit of the man
Above the pain descending
Above the pain descending

Today the struggle carries on
I wonder will I live so long
To see the gates being opened up
To a people and their freedom
A people and their freedom



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ISLE OF HOPE, ISLE OF TEARS

On the first day of January,
eighteen ninety-two,
they opened Ellis Island and they let
the people through
And the first to cross the treshold
of that isle of hope and tears,
was Annie Moore from Ireland
who was only fifteen years

Isle of hope, isle of tears,
isle of freedom, isle of fears,
but it's not the isle you left behind
Isle of hunger, isle of pain,
isle you'll never see again
for the isle of home is always on your mind

In that little bag she carried
all her past and history,
and her dreams for the future
in the land of liberty
And courage is the passport
when your old world disappears
there's no future in the past
when you're fifteen years

Isle of hope, isle of tears,
isle of freedom, isle of fears,
but it's not the isle you left behind
Isle of hunger, isle of pain,
isle you'll never see again
for the isle of home is always on your mind

When they closed down Ellis Island
in nineteen fourty-three,
seventeen million people
had come there for sanctuary
And in springtime when I came here
and I stepped onto its piers,
I thought of how it must have been
when you're fifteen years

Isle of hope, isle of tears,
isle of freedom, isle of fears,
but it's not the isle you left behind
Isle of hunger, isle of pain,
isle you'll never see again
for the isle of home is always on your mind

Isle of hope, isle of tears,
isle of freedom, isle of fears,
but it's not the isle you left behind
Isle of hunger, isle of pain,
isle you'll never see again
for the isle of home is always on your mind



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ISLE OF INISHFREE

I've heard some folks who say that I'm a dreamer
And I've no doubt there's truth in what they say
But sure a body's bound to be a dreamer
When all the things he loves are far away
And precious things are dreams unto an exile
they take him o'er a land across the sea
Especially when it happens you're and exile from that dear lovely Isle of Innishfree

Chorus:
And when the moonlight peeps across the
rooftops of this great city, wondrous though it be
I scarcely feel it's wonder or it's laughter
I'm once again back home in Inishfree

I wonder o'er green hills, through dreamy valleys
And find a peace no other land could know
I hear the birds make music fit for angels
And watch the rivers laughing as they flow

But dreams don't last though dreams are not forgotten
And soon I'm back to stern reality
But though they pave the footpaths here with gold dust
I still would choose my Isle of Inishfree



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'T WAS PRETTY TO BE IN BALLINDERRY

'Twas pretty to be in Ballinderry
'Twas pretty to be in Aghalee
Still prettier to be on bonny Ram's Island
Sitting forever beneath a tree

For often I sailed to bonny Ram's Island
Arm in arm with Phelim, my diamond
And he would whistle and I would sing
And we would make the whole island ring

"I'm going," he said, "from bonny Ram's Island
Out and across the deep blue sea
And if in your heart you love me, Mary
Open your arms at last to me"

'Twas pretty to be in Ballinderry
But now it's as sad as sad can be
For the ship that sailed with Phelim, my diamond
Is sunk forever beneath the sea

'Twas pretty to be in Ballinderry
'Twas pretty to be in Aghalee
Still prettier to be on bonny Ram's Island
Sitting forever beneath a tree



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JAMES CONNOLLY

A great crowd had gathered outside of Kilmainham
With their heads uncovered they knelt on the ground
For inside that grim prison lay a brave Irish soldier
His life for his country about to lay down

He went to his death like a true son of Ireland
The firing party he bravely did face
Then the order rang out: "Present Arms, Fire!"
James Connolly fell into a ready-made grave

The black flag was hoisted the cruel deed was over
Gone was the man who loved Ireland so well
There was many a sad heart in Dublin that morning
When they murdered James Connolly, the Irish Rebel!

God's curse on you, England, you cruel-hearted monster
Your deeds they would shame all the devils in hell
There are no flowers blooming but the shamrock is growing
On the grave of James Connolly, the Irish Rebel!

Many years have rolled by since that Irish rebellion
When the guns of Britannia they loudly did speak
The bold I.R.A. they stood shoulder to shoulder
And the blood from their bodies flowed down Sackville Street

The Four Courts of Dublin the English bombarded
The spirit of Freedom they tried hard to quell
For above all the din rose the cry "No Surrender,"
'Twas the voice of James Connolly, the Irish Rebel



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JOHNNY BE FAIR

Oh, Johnny be fair and Johnny be fine he wants me for to wed
And I would marry Johnny, but me father up and said
"I'm sorry to tell you daughter, what your mother never knew
But Johnny is a son of mine and so he's kin to you"

Oh, Willie be fair and Willie be fine he wants me for to wed
And I would marry Willie, but me father up and said
"I'm sorry to tell you daughter, what your mother never knew
But Willie too is a son of mine and so he's kin to you"

Oh, Thomas be fair and Thomas be fine he wants me for to wed
And I would marry Thomas, but me father up and said
"I'm sorry to tell you daughter, what your mother never knew
But Thomas is a son of mine and so he's kin to you"

Oh, you never saw a maid so sad and sorry as I was
The lads in town were all me kin and me father was the cause
If life should thus continue, I will die a single miss
I think I'll go to mother and complain to her of this

"Oh, daughter, haven't I told you to forgive and to forget?
Your father sowed his wild oats, but still you need not fret
Your father may be father to all the lads in town, but still
He's not the one who sired you, so marry whom you will"



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JOHNNY I HARDLY KNEW YE

While goin' the road to sweet Athy, hurroo, hurroo
While goin' the road to sweet Athy, hurroo, hurroo
While goin' the road to sweet Athy
A stick in me hand and a drop in me eye
A doleful damsel I heard cry
Johnny I hardly knew ye

With your drums and guns and drums and guns, hurroo, hurroo
With your drums and guns and drums and guns, hurroo, hurroo
With your drums and guns and drums and guns
The enemy nearly slew ye
Oh my darling dear, Ye look so queer
Johnny I hardly knew ye

Where are your eyes that were so mild, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your eyes that were so mild, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your eyes that were so mild
When my heart you so beguiled
Why did ye run from me and the child
Oh Johnny, I hardly knew ye

Where are your legs that used to run, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your legs that used to run, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your legs that used to run
When you went for to carry a gun
Indeed your dancing days are done
Oh Johnny, I hardly knew ye

I'm happy for to see ye home, hurroo, hurroo
I'm happy for to see ye home, hurroo, hurroo
I'm happy for to see ye home
All from the island of Sulloon
So low in flesh, so high in bone
Oh Johnny I hardly knew ye

Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg, hurroo, hurroo
Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg, hurroo, hurroo
Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg
Ye're an armless, boneless, chickenless egg
Ye'll have to put with a bowl out to beg
Oh Johnny I hardly knew ye

They're rolling out the guns again, hurroo, hurroo
They're rolling out the guns again, hurroo, hurroo
They're rolling out the guns again
But they never will take our sons again
No they never will take our sons again
Johnny I'm swearing to ye



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JOHNSON'S MOTOR CAR

It was down by Brannigan's corner one morning I did stray
I met a fellow rebel and to me he did say
We have orders from our Captain to assemble at Dunbar
But how are we to get there without a motor car

Oh Barney dear be of good cheer I'll tell you what we'll do
The Specials they are plentiful but the I.R.A. are few
We'll send a wire to Johnson to meet us at Stranlar
And we'll give the boys a jolly good drive in Johnson's Motor Car

When Doctor Johnson heard the news he soon put on his shoes
He said this is an urgent case, there is not time to lose
He then put on his castor hat and on his breast a star
You could hear the din going through Glen Fin of Johnson's Motor Car

But when he got to the Railway Bridge, the rebels he saw there
Ould Johnson knew the game was up for at him they did stare
He said I have a permit to travel near and far
To hell with your English permit, we want you motor car

What will my loyal brethren think when they hear the news
My car it has been commandeered by the rebels at Dunluce
We'll give you a receipt for it, all signed by Captain Barr
And when Ireland gets her freedom, boy, you'll get your motor car!

Well they put that car in motion and they filled it to the brim
With guns and bayonets shining, which made ould Johnson grim
Then Barney hoisted the Sinn Fein flag and it fluttered like a star
And we gave three cheers for the I.R.A. and Johnson's motor car



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THE JOLLY BEGGARMAN

I am a little beggarman, a begging I have been
For three score years in this little isle of green
I'm known along the Liffey from the Basin to the Zoo
And everybody calls me by the name of Johnny Dhu

Of all the trades a going, sure the begging is the best
For when a man is tired he can sit him down and rest
He can beg for his dinner, he has nothing else to do
But to slip around the corner with his old rigadoo

I slept in a barn one night in Currabawn
A shocking wet night it was, but I slept until the dawn
There was holes in the roof and the raindrops coming thru
And the rats and the cats were a playing peek a boo

Who did I waken but the woman of the house
With her white spotted apron and her calico blouse
She began to frighten and I said boo
Sure, don't be afraid at all, it's only Johnny Dhu

I met a little girl while a walkin out one day
Good morrow little flaxen haired girl, I did say
Good morrow little beggarman and how do you do
With your rags and your tags and your auld rigadoo

I'll buy a pair of leggins and a collar and a tie
And a nice young lady I'll go courting by and by
I'll buy a pair of goggles and I'll color them with blue
And an old fashioned lady I will make her too

So all along the high road with my bag upon my back
Over the fields with my bulging heavy sack
With holes in my shoes and my toes a peeping thru
Singing, skin a ma rink a doodle with my auld rigadoo

Oh I must be going to bed for it's getting late at night
The fire is all raked and now tis out of light
For now you've heard the story of my auld rigadoo
So good and God be with you, from auld Johnny Dhu



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JUG OF PUNCH

Twas very early in the month of June
As I was sitting with my glass and spoon
A small bird sat on an ivy bush
And the song he sang was the jug of punch

CHORUS:
Too-rah-loo-rah-loo Too-rah-loo-rah-lay Too-rah-loo-rah-loo
Too-rah-loo-rah-lay A small bird sat on an ivy bush
And the song he sang was the jug of punch

If I were sick and very bad
And was not able to go or stand
I would not think it at all amiss
To pledge my shoes for a jug of punch

What more diversion can a man desire
Than to sit him down by a snug coal fire
Upon his knee a pretty wench
And upon the table a jug of punch

And when I'm dead and in my grave
No costly tomb stone will I have
I'll dig a grave both wide and deep
With a jug of punch at my head and feet



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JUST GIVE ME YOUR HAND

Just give me your hand
And I'll walk with you
Through the streets of our land
Through the mountains so grand
if you give me your hand

Just give me your hand
and come along with me
will you give me your hand
and the world it can see
that we can be free
in peace and harmony
from the north to the south
from the east to the west
every mountain
every valley
every bush and bird's nest

by day and night
through our struggle and strife
and beside you to guide you
forever my love
for love's not for one, but
for both of us to share
for our country so fair
for a world that waits there

just give me your hand
 
just give me your hand
for the world it is ours
for the sea and the land
to destroy or command
if you give me your hand

just give me your hand
in a gesture of peace
Will you give me your hand
and all troubles will cease
for the strong and the weak
for the rich and the poor
all peoples and creeds
let's meet their needs
with a passion
we could fashion
a new world of love

Chorus



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KATHLEEN MAVOURNEEN

Kathleen Mavourneen! the grey dawn is breaking
The horn of the hunter is heard on the hill
The lark from her light wing the bright dew is shaking
Kathleen Mavourneen! What, slumbering still!

O hast thou forgotten how soon we must sever?
O hast thou forgotten this day we must part?
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Oh, why art thou silent, thou voice of my heart?
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Then why art thou silent, Kathleen Mavourneen?

Kathleen Mavourneen! Awake from thy slumbers
The blue mountains glow in the sun's golden light
Ah! Where is the spell that once hung on my numbers?
Arise in thy beauty, thou star of my night

Mavourneen, mavourneen, my sad tears are falling
To think that from Erin and thee I must part
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Oh, why art thou silent, thou voice of my heart?
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Then why art thou silent, Kathleen Mavourneen?



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KELLY OF KILLANE

What's the news, what's the news, oh my bold Chevalier
With your long barrelled gun of the sea?
Say what wind from the south blows his messenger here
With a hymn of the dawn for the free
Goodly news, goodly news, do I bring youth of forth
Goodly news shall you hear, Bargy man
For the boys march at morn from the south to the north
Led by Kelly the boy from Killane

Tell me who is that giant with gold curling hair
He who rides at the head of your band?
Seven feet is his height, with some inches to spare
And he looks like a king in command
Ah my lads that's the pride of the bold chevaliers
'Mong our greatest of heroes, a man!
Fling your beavers aloft and give three ringing cheers
For John Kelly, the boy from Killane

Enniscorthy's in flames, and old Wexford is won
And the Barrow tomorrow we cross
On ahill o'er the town we have planted a gun
That will batter the gateway of Ross
All the Forth men and Bargy men march o'er the heath
With brave Harvey to lead on the van
But the foremost of all in the grim Gap of Death
Will be Kelly, the boy from Killane

But the gold sun of freedom grew darkened at Ross
And it set by the Slaneys red waves
And poor Wexford stript naked hung high on a cross
And her heart pierce by traitors and slaves
Glory O! Glory O! to her brave sons who died
For the cause of long down-trodden man!
Glory O! to Mount Leinster's own darling and pride
Dauntless Kelly, the boy from Killane



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THE KERRY DANCE

Chorus:
Oh, the days of the Kerry dancing
Oh, the ring of the piper's tune
Oh, for one of those hours of gladness
Gone, alas, like our youth, too soon!

When the boys began to gather
In the glen of a summer's night
And the Kerry piper's tuning
Made us long with wild delight!
Oh, to think of it
Oh, to dream of it
Fills my heart with tears!

Chorus

Was there ever a sweeter Colleen
In the dance than Eily More
Or a prouder lad than Thady
As he boldly took the floor

Lads and lasses to your places
Up the middle and down again
Ah, the merry hearted laughter
Ringing through the happy glen!
Oh, to think of it
Oh, to dream of it
Fills my heart with tears!

Chorus

Time goes on, and the happy years are dead
And one by one the merry hearts are fled
Silent now is the wild and lonely glen
Where the bright glad laugh will echo ne'er again
Only dreaming of days gone by in my heart I hear

Loving voices of old companions
Stealing out of the past once more
And the sound of the dear old music
Soft and sweet as in days of yore

When the boys began to gather
In the glen of a summer's night
And the Kerry piper's tuning
Made us long with wild delight!
Oh, to think of it
Oh, to dream of it
Fills my heart with tears!

Chorus



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THE KERRY RECRUIT

About four years ago, I was digging the land
with my brogues on my feet and my spade in my hand
says I to myself what a pity to see
Such a fine strapping lad footing turf in Tralee

Chorus:
Wid me toora na nya, and me toora na nya
Wid me toora na noora na noora na nya

So I buttoned my brogues and shook hands with my spade
and I went to the fair like a dashing young blade
When up comes the sergeant and asks me to 'list
"Arra, Sergeant, a gra, put the bob in my fist"

And the first thing they gave me it was a red coat
with a wide strap of leather to tie round my throat
They gave me a quare thing, I asked what was that
and they told me it was a cockade for my hat

The next thing they gave me, they called it a gun
with powder and shot and a place for my thumb
And first she spit fire and then she spit smoke
Lord, she gave a great lep and my shoulder near broke

The next place they sent me was down to the sea
On board of a warship bound for the Crimea
Three sticks in the middle all rowled round with sheets
Faith, she walked thro' the water without any feet

We fought at the Alma, likewise Inkermann
but the Russians they whaled us at the Redan
In scaling the walls there myself lost my eye
and a big Russian bullet ran off with my thigh

It was there I lay bleeding, stretched on the cold ground
heads, legs and arms were scattered all around
Says I, if my man or my cleaveens were nigh
they'd bury me decent and raise a loud cry

They brought me the doctor, who soon staunched my blood
and he gave me an elegant leg made of wood
They gave me a medal and tenpence a day
contented with Sheela, I'll live on half-pay



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KEVIN BARRY

[Kevin Barry was a young volunteer in the IRA. He was caught
hiding under a truck after an ambush on British troops in
Queen Street, Dublin, in which a british soldier was killed.
He was sentenced to death and was hung on 1st November 1920.]

In Mountjoy jail one Monday morning
High upon the gallows tree
Kevin Barry gave his young life
For the cause of liberty

But a lad of eighteen summers
Still there's no one can deny
As he walked to death that morning
He proudly held his head on high

Just before he faced the hangman
In his dreary prison cell
The Black and Tans tortured Barry
Just because he wouldn't tell

The names of his brave comrades
And other things they wished to know
"Turn informer and we'll free you"
Kevin Barry answered, "no"

"Shoot me like a soldier
Do not hang me like a dog
For I fought to free old Ireland
On that still September morn"

"All around the little bakery
Where we fought them hand to hand
Shoot me like a brave soldier
For I fought for Ireland"

"Kevin Barry, do not leave us
On the scaffold you must die!"
Cried his broken-hearted mother
As she bade her son good-bye

Kevin turned to her in silence
Saying, "Mother, do not weep
For it's all for dear old Ireland
And it's all for freedom's sake"

Calmly standing to attention
While he bade his last farewell
To his broken hearted mother
Whose grief no one can tell

For the cause he proudly cherished
This sad parting had to be
Then to death walked softly smiling
That old Ireland might be free

Another martyr for old Ireland
Another murder for the crown
Whose brutal laws to crush the Irish
Could not keep their spirit down

Lads like Barry are no cowards
From the foe they will not fly
Lads like Barry will free Ireland
For her sake they'll live and die



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LAKES OF COOLFIN

It was early one mornin' young Willie rose
and off to his comrade's bed chamber did go
sayin, "Arise dearest comrades! Let nobody know"
"It's a fine summer's mornin' and a bathin' we'll go!"

Well Willie plunged in and he swam to lay ground
'till he came to an island of soft marshy gound
crying, "Comrades dearest comrades, do not venture in!
For there's false and deep waters in the Lakes of Coolfin

well early next morning Willie's sister arose
and onto her mother's bedchamber did go
sayin', "I had a sad dream 'bout Willie last night
He was clad in a shroud, In a shroud of snow white"

Well later that evening Willie's mother stood there
she was ringing her fingers and tearing her hair
saying woe to the hour young Willie plunged in
For there's false and deep waters in the Lakes of Coolfin

Well I saw a fair maid standing fast by the shore
her face it was sad she was crying for sure
singing woe to the hour young Willie plunged in
For there's false and deep waters in the Lakes of Coolfin



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LAKES OF PONTCHARTRAIN

T'was on one bright March morning I bid New Orleans adieu
And I took the rode to Jackson town, me fortune to renew
I cursed all foreign money, no credit could I gain
Which filled me heart with longin' for the Lakes of Pontchartain

I stepped on board of a railroad car beneath the morning sun
And I rode the roads 'til evening and I laid me down again
All strangers here, no friends to me 'til a dark girl towards me came
And I fell in love with a Creole girl from the Lakes of Pontchartrain

I said my pretty Creole girl, me money here's no good
If it weren't for the alligators I'd sleep out in the wood
You're welcome here kind stranger, our house it's very plain
But we never turn a stranger out at the Lakes of Pontchartrain

She took me to her mummy's house and she treated me quite well
The hair upon her shoulders in jet black ringlets fell
To try and paint her beauty I'm sure t'would be in vain
So handsome was my Creole girl from the Lakes of Pontchartrain

I asked her if she'd marry me, she'd said it could never be
For she had got another and he was far at sea
She said that she would wait for him and true she would remain
'Til he returned for his Creole girl from the Lakes of Pontchartrain

So fair thee well me bonny o' girl I never see no more
But I'll ne'er forget your kindness and the cottage by the shore
And at each social gathering a flowin' glass I'll raise
And drink a health to me Creole girl from the Lakes of Pontchartrain



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THE LANGER

By Tim O'Riordan & Natural Gas

Have you seen the young man
The drunken auld lout
Roaring and bawling and spilling his stout
And in everyone's business
You'll first see his snout
Down in Cork, he'd be known as a langer!
A langer (crowd: a langer)
In Cork, he'd be known as a langer!

And our hero Roy Keane
Footballer supreme
The finest this country and Man U's ever seen
And we'd have won the World Cup
But Mick McCarthy fouled up
Roy was dead right to call him a langer!
A langer (a langer)
Roy was dead right to call him a langer!

Féach an phleice amach romhainn
ag bladairt trína thóin
Níl gaelinn ag éine
dár leis, ach é féin
Tá aige fomhraíocht sár-bhinn
Is gramadach fíor chrinn
I gCorcaigh, gan dabht, sé an Langer!
An langer (an langer)
I gCorcaigh, gan dabht, sé an Langer!

In two thousand and five
Culture will thrive
All along the green banks of the Lee (oh good man George!)
But no matter what
Even if you arrive on your yacht
We'll tolerate absolutely nobody acting the langer! (certainly not in Crosshaven!)
Langer, langer
There'll be nobody acting the langer

So three cheers for Roy Keane
He's back wearing the green
Ah, what more could you ask him to do?
So forget all the press
And the whole bloody mess
They're only a big shower of langers
Langers, langers
They're only a big shower of langers

So there was me song
I didn't keep you too long
For now ye all know one more word of Cork slang
And while there's meat on me bones
I hope I'll never be known
As a typical, home-grown Cork langer!

Langer (crowd: langer)
As a typical home-grown Cork langer!

Langer (crowd: langer)
As a typical home-grown Cork langer



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LANIGAN'S BALL

In the town of Athy one Jeremy Lanigan
Battered away 'til he hadn't a pound
His father he died and made him a man again
Left him a farm and ten acres of ground
He gave a grand party to friends and relations
Who didn't forget him when it comes to the will
And if you'll but listen I'll make your eyes glisten
Of the rows and the ructions of Lanigan's Ball

Chorus:
Six long months I spent in Dublin
six long months doing nothing at all
Six long months I spent in Dublin
learning to dance for Lanigan's Ball

Myself to be sure got free invitation
For all the nice girls and boys I might ask
And just in a minute both friends and relations
Were dancing 'round merry as bees 'round a cask
Judy O'Daly, that nice little milliner
She tipped me a wink for to give her a call
And I soon arrived with Peggy McGilligan
Just in time for Lanigan's Ball

Chorus

There were lashings of punch and wine for the ladies
Potatoes and cakes; there was bacon and tea
There were the Nolans, Dolans, O'Gradys
Courting the girls and dancing away
Songs they went 'round as plenty as water
"The harp that once sounded in Tara's old hall,"
"Sweet Nelly Gray" and "The Rat Catcher's Daughter,"
All singing together at Lanigan's Ball

Chorus

They were doing all kinds of nonsensical polkas
All 'round the room in a whirligig
Julia and I, we banished their nonsense
And tipped them the twist of a reel and a jig
'Och mavrone, how the girls got all mad at me
Danced 'til you'd think the ceiling would fall
For I spent three weeks at Brooks' Academy
Learning new steps for Lanigan's Ball

She stepped out and I stepped in again
I stepped out and she stepped in again
She stepped out and I stepped in again
Learning new steps for Lanigan's Ball

Boys were all merry and the girls they were hearty
And danced all around in couples and groups
'Til an accident happened, young Terrance McCarthy
Put his right leg through miss Finnerty's hoops
Poor creature fainted and cried, "Meelia murther"
Called for her brothers and gathered them all
Carmody swore that he'd go no further
'Til he had satisfaction at Lanigan's Ball

In the midst of the row miss Kerrigan fainted
Her cheeks at the same time as red as a rose
Some of the lads declared she was painted
She took a small drop too much, I suppose
Her sweetheart, Ned Morgan, so powerful and able
When he saw his fair colleen stretched out by the wall
Tore the left leg from under the table
And smashed all the Chaneys at Lanigan's Ball

Boys, oh boys, 'twas then there were runctions
Myself got a lick from big Phelim McHugh
I soon replied to his introduction
And kicked up a terrible hullabaloo
Old Casey, the piper, was near being strangled
They squeezed up his pipes, bellows, chanters and all
The girls, in their ribbons, they got all entangled
And that put an end to Lanigan's Ball



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THE LARK IN THE CLEAR AIR

Dear thoughts are in my mind
And my soul soars enchanted
As I hear the sweet lark sing
In the clear air of the day
For a tender beaming smile
To my hope has been granted
And tomorrow she shall hear
All my fond heart would say

I shall tell her all my love
And my soul's adoration
And I think she will hear me
And will not say me nay
It is this that gives my soul
All its joyous elation
As I hear the sweet lark sing
In the clear air of the day



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LARK IN THE MORNING

The lark in the morning she arises from her nest
And she ascends all in the air with the dew upon her breast
And with the pretty ploughboy she'll whistle and she'll sing
And at night she'll return to her own nest again

When his day's work is over, oh what then will he do
Perhaps then into some country wake he'll go
And with his pretty sweetheart, he'll dance and he'll sing
And at night he'll return with his love back again

And as they returned from the wake unto the town
The meadows they are mowed and the grass it is cut down
The nightingale she whistles upon the hawthorn spray
And the moon it is a shining upon the new mown hay

Good luck unto the ploughboys wherever they may be
They will take a winsome lass for to sit upon their knee
And with a jug of beer boys, they'll whistle and they'll sing
And the ploughboy is as happy as a prince or a king



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THE LASS OF AUGHRIM

If you'll be the lass of Aughrim
As I am taking you mean to be
Tell me the first token
That passed between you and me

O don't you remember
That night on yon lean hill
When we both met together
Which I am sorry now to tell

The rain falls on my yellow locks
And the dew it wets my skin;
My babe lies cold within my arms;
Lord Gregory, let me in



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THE LEAVING OF LIVERPOOL (1)

Farewell to you, my own true love
I am going far away
I am bound for California
But I know that I'll return some day

Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
And when I return, united we will be
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me
But my darling, when I think of thee

I have shipped on a Yankee sailing ship
Davy Crockett is her name
And Burgess is the captain of her
And they say she is a floating hell

Chorus

Oh the sun is on the harbor love
And I wish I could remain
For I know it will be some long time
before I see you again

Chorus



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THE LEAVING OF LIVERPOOL (2)

Farewell to Prince's Landing Stage
River Mersey, fare thee well
I am bound for California
A place I know right well

Chorus:
So fare thee well, my own true love
When I return united we will be
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that's grieving me
But my darling when I think of thee

I'm bound off for California
By the way of stormy Cape Horn
And I'm bound to write you a letter, love
When I am homeward bound

I have signed on a Yankee Clipper ship
Davy Crockett is her name
And Burgess is the Captain of her
And they say she's a floating Hell

I have shipped with Burgess once before
And I think I know him well
If a man's a seaman, he can get along
If not, then he's sure in Hell

Farewell to lower Frederick Street
Ensign Terrace and Park Lane
For I think it will be a long, long time
Before I see you again

Oh the sun is on the harbor, love
And I wish I could remain
For I know it will be a long, long time
Till I see you again



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THE LEGION OF THE REARGUARD

Up the Republic, they raise their battle cry
Pearse and McDermott will pray for you on high
Eager and ready, for love of you they die
Proud march the soldiers of the Rearguard

Chorus:
Legion of the Rearguard, answering Ireland's call
Hark their martial tramp is heard from Cork to Donegal
Wolfe Tone and Emmett guide you, though your task be hard
De Valera leads you, soldiers of the Legion of the Rearguard

Glorious the morning, through flame and shot and shell
Now rally Ireland, your sons who love you well
Pledged, they'll defend you, through death or prison cell
Wait for the soldiers of the Rearguard

Chorus

Crimson the roadside, the prison wall, the cave
Proof of their valour, go sleep in peace ye brave
Comrade tread lightly, you're near a hero's grave
Proud die the soldiers of the Rearguard



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LIMERICK YOU'RE A LADY

Chorus:
Limerick you're a lady
your Shannon waters tears of joy that flow
The beauty that surrounds you
Ill take it with me love where-e'er I go
While waking in the arms of distant waters
a new day finds me far away from home
And Limerick you're my lady
the one true love that I have ever known

As children you and I spent endless days of fun
In winter's snow or summer's golden sun
We fished in silver streams, the fabric of our dreams
Was fashioned by your loveliness and so I have to say:

The difference time has made, to travellers on their way
Seeking out the beauty of our lands
At shrines the children play, and bells ring out to say
Thank God we're living just to feel the freedom of each day

While walking in the arms of distant waters
A new day finds me far away from home



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LITTLE GREY HOME IN THE WEST
[Written in 1911]

When the golden sun sinks in the west
And the toil of a long day is o'er
Though the road may be long, in the lilt of a song
I forgot I was weary before
Far ahead, where the blue shadows fall
I shall come to contentment and rest
And the toils of the day will be charmed away
In my little grey home of the west

There are hands that will welcome me in
There are lips I am burning to kiss
There are two eyes that shine just bacause they are mine
And a thousand things other men miss
It's a corner of heaven itself
Though it's only a tumble-down nest
But with love brooding there, why no place can compare
With my little grey home in the west



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LORD NELSON
(Tommy Makem, 1967)
[Most of The Nelson Pillar was blown up by private (unknown)
initiative in 1966. One week later the ugly remains of the monument
were removed by the army, they too had to use explosives.]

Lord Nelson stood in pompous state, upon his pillar high
And down along O'Connell Street he cast a wicked eye
He thought how this barbaric race had fought the British Crown
Yet they were content to let him stay right there in Dublin town!

Chorus:
So remember Brave Lord Nelson, boys,
He has never known defeat
And for his reward they stuck him up
In the middle of O'Connell Street!

For many years, Lord Nelson stood, and no one seemed to care
He would squint at Dan O'Connell who was standin right down there
He thought the Irish love me or they wouldnt let me stay
All except that band of blighters that they call the IRA!

And then in nineteen sixty six, on March the seventh day,
A bloody great explosion made Lord Nelson rock and sway!
He crashed, and Dan O'Connell cried, in woeful misery
Now twice as many pigeons will come and shit on me!

Final chorus:
So remember brave Lord Nelson, boys,
He has never known defeat!
And for his reward they blew him up
In the middle of O'Connell Street!



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LORD OF THE DANCE

I danced in the morning when the world was begun
I danced in the moon, the stars and the sun
I danced down from Heaven and I danced on Earth
At Bethlehem I had my birth

Chorus:
Dance, then, wherever you may be
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He
And I'll lead you all, wherever you may be
And I'll lead you all in the dance, said He

I danced for the scribe and the Pharisee
They would not dance; they would not follow me
So I danced for the fisherman, for James and John
They came with me and the dance went on

I danced on the Sabbath and I cured the lame
They holy people said it was a shame
So they whipped, they stripped, they hung me high
And they left me on the cross to die

I danced on a Friday, when the sky turned black
It's hard to dance with the Devil on your back
Oh they buried my body, they thought I'd gone
But I and the dance still go on

They cut me down, but I lept on high
I am the light that will never, never die
But I'll live in you if you'll live in me
I am the Lord of the Dance, said He



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