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    Amhrán na bhFiann - national anthem (1)   A Soldier's Song - national anthem (2)    A Bucket of the Mountain Dew    A Bunch of Thyme   Admiral William Brown   A Fenian Song    A Little Bit of Heaven    All Around My Hat   A Man You Don't Meet Every Day    A Mothers Love Is A Blessing   A Muirsheen Durkin    A Nation Once Again    And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda    A Night To Remember    An Irishman's Dream    The Armagh Sniper   Arthur McBride    A Stór Mo Chroi     B      Back Home In Derry    Ballyroan   The Bard of Armagh    Barry's Column    Belfast Brigade   Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms    The Birmingham Six   The Black And Tan Gun    Black And Tans    Black Is the Colour    Black Velvet Band    The Bold Black And Tan    The Bold Fenian Men    The Bold O'Donohue    Bold Robert Emmet    Bold Tenant Farmer   Bonnie Kellswater    Boolavogue (1)    Boolavogue (2)   Botany Bay    The Boys From the County Armagh   The Boys From the County Cork   The Boys From the County Mayo   Boys of Fairhill   The Boys of Kilkenny    The Boys of Killybegs   Boys of Kilmichael    Boys of the Old Brigade    Bread And Fishes   Brennan On the Moor    Bridgit O'Malley    Bring Them Home   Broad Black Brimmer    Buachaill Ón Éirne      C      Carrickfergus (1)    Carrickfergus (2)    The Cliffs of Doneen    Cockles And Mussels (Molly Malone)    Comical Genius   Courtin' In the Kitchen    The Crack Was Ninety In the Isle of Man    The Creggan White Hare   The Croppy Boy    The Curragh of Kildare      D      Danny Boy    The Dawning of the Day    Dear Boss (The Sick Note)    The Dear Little Shamrock   Death Of Schomberg   The Decommissioning Song   Derry's Deathless Story   De Valera   The Devil And Bailiff McGlynn   Dicey Reilly    Did Your Mother Come From Ireland   Dingle Bay   Dirty Old Town    Down By the Glenside    Down By the Salley Gardens    Do You Want Your Old Lobby Washed Down    Dublin Jack of All Trades      E      Easy And Slow    Eileen Aroon    Erin Go Bragh      F      The Fair At Turloughmore    Fairytale of New York    Fare Thee Well Enniskillen (1)    Fare Thee Well Enniskillen (2)   Farewell To Dublin In My Tears   The Fenian Record Player   The Fenians' Escape    Fiddlers Green    The Fields of Athenry    Finnegan's Wake    Flight of Earls    Flower of Sweet Strabane    The Foggy Dew    Follow Me Up To Carlow    Forty Shades of Green    For What Died the Sons of Róisin   Four Green Fields    Freedom Sons   Free The People   From Clare to Here (1)   From Clare to Here (2)     G      Gallipoli   Galway Bay    Galway Farmer    The Galway Races (1)    The Galway Races (2)   The Galway Races (3)   Gardai 'N Rí   The Garden Where the Praties Grow   Garryowen    Give Me Your Hand   God Bless England    God Save Ireland    Goodbye Mick   The Green Fields of France      H      Hills of Connemara    How Are Things In Glocca Morra      I      If I Was A Blackbird    If You're Irish...    I'll Take You Home Again Kathleen    I'll Tell Me Ma    I.R.E.L.A.N.D.    The Irish Emigrant    The Irish Free State   The Irish Mail Robber   The Irish Rover (1)    The Irish Rover (2)    Irish Soldier Boy    Irish Soldier Laddie    Irish Ways And Irish Laws   Isle of Hope, Isle of Tears   Isle of Inishfree   It Was Pretty To Be In Ballinderry      J      James Connolly    Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier (Shule Agra)    Johnny Be Fair    Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye    Johnson's Motor Car    The Jolly Beggarman    Jug of Punch    Just Give Me Your Hand      K      Kathleen Mavourneen    Kelly of Killane    The Kerry Dance    The Kerry Recruit    Kevin Barry      L      Lakes of Coolfin   Lakes of Pontchartrain    The Langer    Lanigan's Ball    The Lark In the Clear Air    Lark In the Morning    The Lass of Aughrim   The Leaving of Liverpool (1)    The Leaving of Liverpool (2)    The Legion of the Rearguard    Limerick You're A Lady   Little Grey Home In the West   Lord Nelson    Lord of the Dance      M      MacNamara's Band    Macushla   The Maid Who Sold Her Barley    Maids When You're Young    The Man From the Daily Mail    Many Young Men of Twenty   Mc Alpine's Fusiliers    The Meeting of the Waters    The Men Behind the Wire    The Men of the West    The Merry Ploughboy    Michael Collins    The Minstrel Boy    Mo Ghile Mear    Molly Malone (Cockles And Mussels)    The Mountain Tay    Mountains of Mourne    My Uncle Is In the Dáil      N      Nell Flaherty's Drake    Nelson's Farewell    No Irish Need Apply      O      O'Donnell Abu    Old Fenian Gun   The Old Man   Only Our Rivers Run Free    On Midsummer Day    On the One Road    The Ould Woman From Wexford   Our Lads In Crumlin Jail     P      Paddy McGinty's Goat    Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore (1)    Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore (2)   Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore (3)   Paddy's Lamentation   Padraig Pearse   The Parting Glass    Patrick Street   The Patriot Game    Peggy Gordon    Peggy Lettermore (1)   Peggy Lettermore (2)   The Peoples Own M.P.   Pick Up Your Rifle   Poor Paddy On the Railway    Preab San Ol   Pretty Little Girl From Omagh     Q      Queen of Connemara     R      Raglan Road    The Rare Oul' Times    Red Is the Rose    Reilly's Daughter (1)    Reilly's Daughter (2)    The Reluctant Patriot    The Rifles of the I.R.A.    The Rising of the Moon (1)    The Rising of the Moon (2)    Roads of Kildare   Rocky Road To Dublin    Roddy McCorley    Róisin Dubh   The Rose of Mooncoin    The Rose of Tralee    Rosin the Beau      S      The Sea Around Us    Sean South of Garryowen    Seven Drunken Nights (1)    Seven Drunken Nights (2)   The Shores of Amerikay    Shule Agra (Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier)    The Sick Note (Dear Boss)    Skibbereen (1)    Skibbereen (2)    Slane (Be Thou My Vision)    Slievenamon   The Snowy Breasted Pearl    Spancil Hill    The Spanish Lady    The Spinning Wheel    Star of the County Down (1)    Star of the County Down (2)    Step It Out Mary    The Stone Outside Dan Murphy's Door   The Streets of New York   Sullivan's John    Summer In Dublin     T      Take Her Up To Monto (1)   Take Her Up To Monto (2)   Tara's Harp    They Never Came Home (Stardust Song)    The Thirty-Two Counties    This Land Is Your Land (1)   This Land Is Your Land (2)   This Land Is Your Land (3)   Three Leaf Shamrock   The Tinker   The Town I Loved So Well    Tri-Coloured Ribbon   'T Was Pretty To Be In Ballinderry      V      The Valley of Knockanure      W      Waxies Dargle    The Wearing of the Green    Weila Waila    The West's Awake    The Wexford Carol   When Irish Eyes Are Smiling    When You Were Sweet Sixteen   Where the River Shannon Flows   Where the Three Counties Meet   Whiskey In the Jar (1)    Whiskey In the Jar (2)    Whiskey You're the Devil    Whistling Gypsy    The Wild Colonial Boy    The Wild Rover    Will You Come To the Bower    The Winds Are Singing Freedom    The Wind That Shakes the Barley      Z      Zoological Gardens   


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PADDY McGINTY'S GOAT

Patrick McGinty, an Irishman of note
Came into a fortune, so bought himself a goat
Said he, "Sure, of goat's milk I mean to have my fill!"
But when he got his Nanny home, he found it was a Bill

And now all the ladies who live in Killaloo
Are all wearing bustles like their mothers used to do
They each wear a bolster beneath the petticoat
And leave the rest to Providence and Paddy McGinty's goat!

Missis Burke to her daughter said, "Listen, Mary Jane,
Now who was the man you were cuddling in the lane?
He'd long wiry whiskers all hanging from his chin"
"Twas only Pat McGinty's goat, " she answer'd with a grin

Then she went away from the village in disgrace
She came back with powder and paint upon her face
She'd rings on her fingers, and she wore a sable coat
You bet your life they never came from Paddy McGinty's goat

Little Norah McCarthy the knot was going to tie
She washed all her trousseau and hung it out to dry
Then up came the goat and he saw the bits of white:
He chewed up all her falderals, and on her wedding night:

"Oh turn out the gas quick!" she shouted out to Pat
For though l'm your bride, sure l'm not worth looking at
I'd got two of ev'rything, I told you when I wrote
But now I've one of nothing, all thro' Paddy McGinty's goat'

Mickey Riley he went to the races t'other day
He won twenty dollars and shouted, "Hip Hooray!!"
He held up the note, shouting "Look what I've got!"
The goat came up and grabbed at it and swallowed all the lot

"He's eaten my banknote," said Mickey, with the hump
They ran for the doctor, he brought a stomach pump
He pumped and he pumped for that twenty dollar note
But all he got was ninepence out of Paddy McGinty's goat



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PADDY'S GREEN SHAMROCK SHORE (1)
(Words & music trad.)

From Derry quay we sailed away
On the 23rd of May
We were taken on board by a pleasant crew
Bound for Americay
Fresh water there we did take on
Five thousand gallons or more
In case we'd run short going to New York
Far away from the Shamrock shore

So fare thee well, sweet Lisa dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold
Who still dwell on that sainted ground
If ever fortune will favour me
And I do have money in store
I will come back and wed the sweet lassie I left
On Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore

We sailed three days, we were all seasick
And no-one on board was free
We were all confined unto our bunks
With no one to pity poor me
No fond mother dear, no father kind
To comfort my head went to sore
This made me think more on the wee girl I left
On Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore

We savely reached the other side
In fifteen and twenty days
We were taken as passengers by a man
And led round in six different ways
So each of us drunk a parting glas
In case that we never meet more
And we bade farewell to old Ireland
And Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore

So fare thee well, sweet Lisa dear
And likewise to Derry town
And twice farewell to my comrades bold
Who still dwell on that sainted ground
If fame or fortune will favour me
And I do have money in store
I'll go back and I'll wed the wee lassy I left
On Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore



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PADDY'S GREEN SHAMROCK SHORE (2)

Oh fare-thee-well, Ireland, my own dear native land
It breaks my heart to see friends part, for it's then that the teardrops fall;
I'm on my way to Amerikay, will I e'er see my home once more?
For now I leave my own true love on Paddy's green shamrock shore

Our ship she lies at anchor, she's standing by the quay
May fortune bright shine down each night, as we sail over the sea
Many ships were lost, many lives it cost on the journey that lies before
With a tear in my eye I'm bidding good-bye to Paddy's Green shamrock shore

So fare thee well my own true love, I'll think of you night and day
And a place in my mind you surely will find, although I am so far away
Though I'll be alone far away from my home, I'll think of the good times once more
Until the day I can make my way back to Paddy's green shamrock shore

And now the ship is on the waves may heaven protect us all
With the wind in the sail we surely can't fail on this voyage to Baltimore
But my parents and friends did wait till the end, till I could see them no more
I then took a chance for to glance at Paddy's green shamrock shore



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PADDY'S GREEN SHAMROCK SHORE (3)

Oh fare thee well to Ireland, my own dear native land
It breaks my heart to see friends part, for it's then that the tear drops fall
I'm on my way to Amerikay, will I ever see home once more
For now I leave my own true love, and Paddy's green shamrock shore

From Londonderry we did sail, it being the fourth of May
Pleasant weather I'm sure we had, going to Amerikay
Fresh water then we did take in, one hundred tons or more
For fear we'd be short on the other side, far from the shamrock shore

Two of our anchors we did weigh, before we left the quay
Down the river we were towed, till we came to Botany Bay
We saw that night the grandest night, we ever saw before
The sun going down 'tween sea and sky, far from the shamrock shore

Early next morning we were sea-sick all, not one of us was free
I myself was confined to bed, with no one to pity me
No father or no mother, to raise my head when sore
That made me think of the friends I left, on the lonely shamrock shore

We landed safely in New York, after four and twenty days
Each comrade by the hand we took, and we marched through different ways
Each one drank a flowing glass, as we might meet no more
With flowing bumpers we drank a health, to the lonely shamrock shore



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PADDY'S LAMENTATION

Well it's by the hush me boys and sure that's to hold your noise
Listen to poor Paddy's sad narration
Well I was by hunger pressed and in poverty distressed
So I took a thought, I'd leave the Irish nation
Well I sold me horse and cow, me little pig and sow
Me little plot of land I sold to part with
And me sweetheart Bid McGee, I'm afraid I'll never see
For I left her there that morning broken-hearted

Chorus:
Here's you boys, now take my advice
To America I'll have you not be comming
There is nothing here but war
Where the murdering cannons roar
And I wish I was at home in dear old Dublin

Well, meself and a hundred more to Americay sailed o'er
Our fortune to be made, oh we were thinking
When we got to Yankee-land, they shoved a gun into our hands
Saying "Paddy, you must go and fight for Lincoln"

Chorus

General Meaghar to us he said "If you get shot or lose your head
Each murdering son of yours will get a pension"
Well, myself I lost me leg, they gave me a wooden peg
And by God this is the truth to you I mention

Chorus

When I think myself in luck, I get fed on Indian buck
And Ireland is the country I delight in
With the devil I did say, it's curse Americay
For I think I've had enough of your hard fighting

Chorus



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PADRAIG PEARSE

In Dublin town in nineteen sixteen a flame of freedom did arise
A group of men with determination caught an empire by surprise
Through the streets our men were marching
They rallied with their hopes and fears
And the End the boys came searching for their leader Padraig Pearse

Chorus:
The poet and the Irish rebel a Gaelic scholar and a visionary
We gave to him no fitting tribute
When Ireland's at peace only that can be
When Ireland a nation, united and free

On Easter morn he faced the nation from the steps of the G.P.O
And read aloud the proclamation, the seed of nationhood to sow
But soon the word had spread to London of an insurrection there at hand
And the deeds of Padraic Pearse was set about to free his land

For five long days the battle rages, for five long nights the battle wore
We will watch as Dublin City blazes and see our men fall through the floor
No Ireland's proud of her effort for her cause we fought with pride
But to save more life and to save our city, we make our peace with McFainis cried

Kilmainham Jail in 1916, they brought young Pearse
to his death cell and they tried him as a traitor
to shoot this man who dared to rebel
He only tried to free his country of the shackles of 800 years
When dawn did break on that May morning
they shot our Leader Padraic Pearse



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THE PARTING GLASS

O, all the money e'er I had
I spent it in good company
And all the harm that ever I've done
alas it was to none but me
And all I've done for want of wit
to mem'ry now I can't recall
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all

O, all the comrades e'er I had
They're sorry for my going away
And all the sweethearts e'er I had
They'd wished me one more day to stay
But since it falls unto my lot
That I should rise and you should not
I gently rise and softly call
Goodnight and joy be with you all

If I had money enough to spend
And leisure time to sit awhile
There is a fair maid in this town
That sorely has my heart beguiled
Her rosy cheeks and ruby lips
I own, she has my heart in thrall
Then fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all



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PATRICK STREET

You sailor lads, come lend an ear, and listen to me song
it's of a trick 'twas played on me, and won't detain you long:
I came home from see the other day and a girl I chanced to meet
and she's asked me up along with her to dance in Patrick Street

Well says I "me pretty fair maid, I cannot dance too well
besides I'm bound for Newry town where my parents they do dwell
I've been at sea these last few years and I've saved up fifty pounds
and me parents are expecting me, tonight in Newry town"

"Well since you cannot dance too well then you shall have a treat:
You can have a glass of brandy, and something nice to eat
At nine o'clock this evening I'll lead you to your train
but don't forget to call on me when you come back again"

Well she seemed to be so friendly, I went and hired a car
We both went down to Patrick Street and on arrival there
some people on the other side, I thought I heard them say
"He'll sure be in need of a jaunting car, before he gets away"

We had not been long in the room when whiskey it came in
and when everyone had had their fill, the dancing did begin
Me and me love we danced around all to a merry tune
while the other couples did the double-shuffle 'round the room

And when dancin' it was over, for bed we did prepare -
and after that, I fell asleep - the Truth I do declare
me darling and me fifty pounds - me gold'n'all had fled!
And there was I meself alone stark naked lying in bed!

In gazing all around me nothing could I spy
but a woman's skirt and jumper at the foot of the bed did lie
I wrung me hands and tore me hair cryin' "Oh what will I do?
Oh fare the well sweet Newry town, I'm sure I'll ne'er see you!"

When night-time it had come again and daylight was away
I put on the skirt and jumper and I set off for the quay
and when I got on board the ship the sailors all did say
"Oh Jack has grown much prettier since last she went away!

And is this the new spring fashion that you went to buy on shore?
And where's the shop that sells them, d'you think they may have more?"
The captain says "Now Jack, I thought you were for Newry town;
you might have bought a better suit than that for fifty pounds!"

Well I might have bought a better suit if I had had the chance
I met a girl in High Street and she's asked me to a dance
I danced me own destruction and I've done it so complete
that I swear I'll never go back again to dance in Patrick Street"

Come all of you young sailor lads, a warning take by me
And always keep good company when you go on a spree
Be sure'n stay clear of Patrick Street or else you'll rue the day
In a woman's skirt and jumper they will ship you back to sea!



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THE PATRIOT GAME
(Dominic Behan)

Come all ye young rebels, and list while I sing
For the love of one's country is a terrible thing
It banishes fear with the speed of a flame
And it makes us all part of the patriot game

My name is O'Hanlon, and I've just turned sixteen
My home is in Monaghan, and where I was weaned
I learned all my life cruel England's to blame
So now I am part of the patriot game

It's nearly two years since I wandered away
With the local battalion of the bold IRA
I learned of our heroes, and wanted the same
To play my own part of the Patriot game

This island of ours has too long been half free
Six counties lie under John Bull's tyranny
So I gave up my boyhood to drill and to train
And that made me a part of the Patriot game

They told me how Connolly was shot in his chair
His wounds from the fighting all bloody and bare
His fine body twisted, all battered and lame
They soon made me part of the patriot game

But now as I lie here, my body all holes
I think of those traitors who bargained in souls
And I wish that my rifle had given the same
To those Quislings who sold out the patriot game



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PEGGY GORDON

Oh, Peggy Gordon, you are my darling
Come sit you down upon my knee
And tell me the very reason
Why I am slighted so by thee

I'm so in love that I can't deny it
My heart lies smothered in my breast
But it's not for you to let the world know it
A troubled mind can know no rest

I put my head to a glass of brandy
It was fancy I do declare
For when I'm drinkin', I'm always thinkin'
And wishing Peggy Gordon was here

I wish I was in some lonesome valley
Where womankind cannot be found
Where the little birds sing upon the branches
And every moment a different sound

I wish I was away in Ingo
Far away across the briny sea
Sailing over deepest waters
Where love nor care never trouble me



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PEGGY LETTERMORE (1, Gaelic)

Chorus:
'S o gairm gaoirm i, is gairim i mo stor
Mile ghra le m' ainm i 'si Peigin Leitir Moir

Ta Brid agam, ta Cait agam, 'si Peig an bhean is fearr
Cibe fear a gheobhfas i, nach air a bheas an t-adh

Chuir me sceala siar aici go ceannoinn di bad mor
'Se an sceal a chuir si aniar agam go ndeanfadh leathbhad seoil

Is ta iascairi na Gaillimhe ag teacht aniar le coir
Le solas gealai gile no go bhfeicfidis an tseoid

Eirigh suas a Pheigin agus seas ar bharr an aird
Comhairigh do chuid bullain agus feach an bhfuil siad ann



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PEGGY LETTERMORE (2, English)

Chorus:
O welcome and acclaimed is she, my love!
Dear to my soul, a thousand told, is Peggy Lettermore

Rise up, dear Peggy and stand up on the height
count all your cattle, and make sure they're all there

I have Brid and I have Kate but Peggy is the best of all
whichever man wins her hand, a lucky man he will be

I sent a message west to her, that I would buy a large boat
She sent a message back to me  that a medium sized sailing boat would do

The Galway fishermen are sailing from the eastwith a fair wind
with the light of a bright moon in order to see the "jewel."



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THE PEOPLES OWN M.P.

How many more must die now, how many must we lose
Until the Island people, their own destiny can choose
From immortal Robert Emmet, to Bobby Sands MP
Who was given 30,000 votes while in captivity

No more he'll hear the larks sweet notes, upon the Ulster air
Or gaze upon the snowflakes pure, for to calm his deep despair
Oh before he went on hunger strike, young Bobby did compose
The Rhythm of Time, the Weeping Wind, and the Sleeping Rose

Chorus:
He was a poet and a soldier, he died courageously
And we gave him 30,000 votes while in captivity

Thomas Ashe, he gave everything, in 1917
The lord mayor of Cork McSweeney died, his freedom to obtain
Never one of all our dead died more courageously
Than young Bobby Sands from Twinbrook, the peoples own MP

Chorus

Forever we'll remember him, the man who died in pain
That his country North & South might be united once again
To mourn him is to organise, and build a movement strong
With ballot box and armalite, with music and with song

Chorus



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PICK UP YOUR RIFLE

In 1916, in the year of our Lord
Fighting came to Ireland like it never had before
For freedom comes to those who fight for its day
So I picked up my rifle and joined the IRA

A free and united Ireland was our only desire
And the best of the British Army couldn't put out that fire
But a deal with the devil was soon put forth
Freedom for the South and nothing for the North

Well this didn't seem really right with me
For Ireland is one from sea to sea
And the IRA said our job's not done
So off to the North I went with my gun

We fought in the fields, we fought in the streets
And the English knew we couldn't be beat
We fought with rifles, we fought with rocks
And sent many a soldier home in a box

The fight has been long and many have fell
And we weep for the rebels who starved alone in a cell
For the price of our freedom is paid with blood
of those IRA men who have died in the mud

Is life so sweet or is peace so dear?
That the weight of chains are easy to bear
For freedom comes to those who fight for its day
So pick up your rifle and join the IRA



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POOR PADDY ON THE RAILWAY

In eighteen hundred and forty one
My corduroy breeches I put on
My corduroy breeches I put on
To work upon the railway
The railway
I'm weary of the railway
Poor Paddy works on the railway

In eighteen hundred and forty two
From Hartlepool I moved to Grove
And found myself a job to do
Working on the railway
I was wearing
Corduroy breeches
Digging ditches
Pulling switches
Dodging hitchers
I was working on the railway

In eighteen hundred and forty three
I broke me shuffle across me knee
I went to work for the company
And leave me seldom railway
I was wearing
Corduroy breeches
Digging ditches
Pulling switches
Dodging hitchers
I was working on the railway

In eighteen hundred and forty four
I landed on the Liverpool shore
Me belly was empty me hands were raw
With working on the railway
The railway
Im weary of the railway
Poor Paddy works on the railway

In eighteen hundred and forty five
When Daniel OConnell he was alive
And Daniel OConnell he was alive
And working on the railway
I was wearing
Corduroy breeches
Digging ditches
Pulling switches
Dodging hitchers
I was working on the railway

In eighteen hundred and forty six
I changed me trade from carrying bricks
Changed me trade from carrying bricks
To working on the railway
I was wearing
Corduroy breeches
Digging ditches
Pulling switches
Dodging hitchers
I was working on the railway

In eighteen hundred and forty seven
Poor Paddy was thinking of going to Heaven
Poor Paddy was thinking of going to Heaven
To work upon the railway
The railway
I'm weary of the railway
Poor Paddy works on the railway

I was wearing
Corduroy breeches
Digging ditches
Pulling switches
Dodging hitchers
I was working on the railway



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PREAB SAN OL

Why spend your leisure bereft of pleasure
A massing treasure why scrape and save?
Why look so canny at ev'ry penny?
You'll take no money within the grave
Landlords and gentry with all their plenty
Must still go empty where 're they're bound
So to my thinking we'd best be drinking
Our glasses clinking and round and round

King Solomon's glory, so famed in story
Was far outshone by the lilies guise
But hard winds harden both field and garden
Pleading for pardon, the lily dies
Life's but a bauble of toil and trouble
The feathered arrow, once shot ne'er found
So, lads and lasses, because life passes
Come fill your glasses for another round

The huckster greedy, he blinds the needy
Their strifes unheeding, shouts "Money down!"
His special vices, his fancy prices
For a florin value he'll charge a crown
With hump for tramel, the scripture's camel
Missed the needle's eye and so came to ground
Why pine for riches, while still you've stitches
To hold your britches up? Another round!



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PRETTY LITTLE GIRL FROM OMAGH

Way up in the north of Tyrone
There's a pretty little girl I called my own
The sweetest rose Ireland ever known
And it's true as the moon and stars above
I falling head over heels in love with
the pretty little girl from Omagh
In the county of Tyrone

There's cut little girls in old Strabane
There's just as pretty in Monaghan
Same as any other place I've known
But I guess that I've be out of bounds(?)
For there between those northern town
Is the pretty little girl from Omagh
In the county of Tyrone

She wears my ring and tells her friend
She's gonna marry me
And best of all, she tells them all
She happy as can be, oh, lucky me, well
I don't know what she done to me
There's nothing else my eyes can see
But the pretty little girl from Omagh
In the county of Tyrone

Way down in the south of  old Tyrone
I recall that yellow dress she wore
As she stood there on the shore there all alone
And I know it was my lucky day
She came there on holiday
The pretty little girl from Omagh
In the county from Tyrone

There's cut little girls in old Strabane
There's just as pretty in Monaghan
Same as any other place I've known
But I guess that I've be out of bounds(?)
For there between those northern town
Is the pretty little girl from Omagh
In the county of Tyrone

She wears my ring and tells her friend
She's gonna marry me
And best of all, she tells them all
She happy as can be, oh, lucky me, well
I don't know what she done to me
There's nothing else my eyes can see
But the pretty little girl from Omagh
In the county of Tyrone



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QUEEN OF CONNEMARA

Oh! My boat can safely float in the teeth of wind and weather
And outrace the fastest hooker between Galway and Kinsale
When the black floor of the ocean and the white foam rush together
High she rides, in her pride, like a sea-gull through the gale

Chorus
Oh she's neat! Oh she's sweet! She's a beauty in ev'ry line!
The Queen of Connemara is that bounding barque of mine

When she's loaded down with fish till the water lips the gunwale
Not a drop she'll take on board her that would wash a fly away;
From the fleet she'll slip out swiftly like a greyhound from her kennel
And she'll land her silver store the first at ould Kinvara quay

There's a light shines out afar, and it keeps me from dismaying
When the skies are ink above us and the sea runs white with foam
In a cot in Connemara there's a wife and wee one praying
To the One who walked the waters once, to send us safely home



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RAGLAN ROAD
[written by Patrick Kavanagh, 1946
This song was recorded and popularized by the great Luke Kelly of the Dubliners
in the 1960s. The words, written by Paddy Kavanagh, were set to the traditional
air 'Fainne Gael an Lae' (The Dawning of the Day). This poem was first published
in 1946 under the name 'Dark haired Myriam ran away'.]


On Raglan Road of an Autumn day
I saw her first and knew
That her dark hair would weave a snare
That I might someday rue
I saw the danger and I passed
Along the enchanted way
And I said, "Let grief be a fallen leaf
At the dawning of the day"

On Grafton Street in November, we
Tripped lightly along the ledge
Of a deep ravine where can be seen
The worth of passion play
The Queen of Hearts still making tarts
And I not making hay
Oh, I loved too much and by such and such
Is happiness thrown away

I gave her gifts of the mind
I gave her the secret signs
That's known to the artists who have known
The true gods of sound and stone
And her words and tint without stint
I gave her poems to say
With her own name there and her own dark hair
Like clouds over fields of May

On a quiet street where old ghosts meet
I see her walking now
And away from me so hurriedly
My reason must allow
That I had loved, not as I should
A creature made of clay
When the angel woos the clay, he'll lose
His wings at the dawn of day



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THE RARE OUL' TIMES

Based on songs and stories, heroes of renown
Are the passing tales and glories, that once was Dublin town
The hallowed halls and houses, the haunting children's rhymes
That once was Dublin city in the rare old times

Chorus:
Ring a-ring a-Rosie, as the light declines
I remember Dublin city in the rare oul' times

My name it is Sean Dempsey, as Dublin as can be
Born hard and late in Pimlico, in a house that ceased to be
By trade I was a cooper, lost out to redundancy
Like my house that fell to progress, my trade's a memory
And I courted Peggy Dignan, as pretty as you please
A rogue and child of Mary, from the rebel Liberties
I lost her to a student chap, with skin as black as coal
When he took her off to Birmingham, she took away my soul

The years have made me bitter, tha gargle dims my brain
'cause Dublin keeps on changing, and nothing seems the same
The Pillar and the Met have gone, the Royal long since pulled down
As the great unyielding concrete, makes a city of my town
Fare thee fell sweet Anna Liffey, I can no longer stay
And watch the new glass cages, that spring up along the Quay
My mind's too full of memories, too old to hear new chimes
I'm part of what was Dublin, in the rare old times

Chorus:
Ring a-ring a-Rosie, as the light declines
I remember Dublin city in the rare oul' times



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RED IS THE ROSE

Come over the hills, my bonnie Irish lass
Come over the hills to your darling
You choose the rose, love, and I'll make the vow
And I'll be your true love forever

Chorus:
Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows
Fair is the lily of the valley
Clear is the water that flows from the Boyne
But my love is fairer than any

'Twas down by Killarney's green woods that we strayed
When the moon and the stars they were shining
The moon shone its rays on her locks of golden hair
And she swore she'd be my love forever

Chorus

It's not for the parting that my sister pains
It's not for the grief of my mother
'Tis all for the loss of my bonny Irish lass
That my heart is breaking forever

Chorus



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REILLY'S DAUGHTER (1)

As I was sitting by the fire
Eating spuds and drinking porter
Suddenly a thought came into my mind
I'd like to marry old Reilly's daughter

Chorus:
Giddy i-ae Giddy i-ae
Giddy i-ae for the one-eyed Reilly
Giddy i-ae (bang bang bang)
Play it on your old bass drum

Reilly played on the big bass drum
Reilly had a mind for murder and slaughter
Reilly had a bright red glittering eye
And he kept that eye on his lovely daughter

Chorus

Her hair was black and her eyes were blue
The colonel and the major and the captain sought her
The sergeant and the private and the drummer boy too
But they never had a chance with Reilly's daughter

Chorus

I got me a ring and a parson too
Got me a scratch in a married quarter
Settled me down to a peaceful life
Happy as a king with Reilly's daughter

Chorus

Suddenly a footstep on the stairs
Who should it be but Reilly out for slaughter
With two pistols in his hands
Looking for the man who had married his daughter

Chorus

I caught old Reilly by the hair
Rammed his head in a pail of water
Fired his pistols into the air
A damned sight quicker than I married his daughter

Chorus



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REILLY'S DAUGHTER (2)

As I was sitting by the fire
Talking to O'Reilly's daughter
Suddenly a thought came into my head
I'd like to marry O'Reilly's daughter

Chorus:
Giddy-i-ay, giddy-i-ay, giddy-i-ay
For the one eyed Reilly Giddy-i-ay (*clap *clap *clap)
Bang it on yer oul' bass drum

Reilly played on the big bass drum
Reilly had a mind for murder and slaughter
Reilly had a bright red glittering eye
And he kept that eye on his lovely daughter

Her hair was black and her eyes were blue
The colonel & the major & the captain sought her
The sergeant & the private & the drummer boy too
But they never had a chance with Reilly's daughter

I got me a ring & parson too
Got me a scratch in a married quarter
Settled me down to a peaceful life
Happy as a king with Reilly's daughter

Suddenly a foot step on the stair
Who whould it be but Reilly out for slaughter
With two pistols in his hands
Looking for the man who had married his daughter

I caught Old Reilly by the hair
Rammed his head in a pail of water
Fired his pistols in the air
A damned sight quicker than I married his daughter



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THE RELUCTANT PATRIOT

"Oh Paddy dear, and did hear the awful things they say?
Princess Margret and Lord Snowden, they have joined the IRA
They are drilling in the mountains to the sounds of fife and drum
Young Tony's taking snapshots while young Maggie fires the gun!"
While young Maggie fires the gun, while young Maggie fires the gun
Young Tony's taking snapshots while young Maggie fires the gun

When the news reached Mother England filled the good queen with delight
She reared upon Prince Phillip in the middle of the night
Said she, "Get you your Rolls-Royce out, and get you ready quick and soon
For we must reach dear ould Ireland by the rising of the moon!"
By the rising of the moon, by the rising of the moon
For we must reach dear ould Ireland by the rising of the moon

When the news reached Dublin Castle De Valera danced for joy
"Ah said he, "That Jones De camera, he's a decent Irish boy
And the dear one Princess Margret, that Ireland's sweet colleen
I knew her uncle very well, he came from Skibbereen"
He came from Skibbereen, he came from Skibbereen
I knew her uncle very well, he came from Skibbereen

"Oh then Paddy dear and did you hear there's trouble in the land
For the Queen and De Valera are walking hand in hand
And the most disgraceful thing me boys, that you have ever seen
Was Prince Pillip playing polo on an ass in Stephen's Green
On an ass in Stephen's Green, on an ass in Stephen's Green
Prince Phillip's playing polo on an ass in Stephen's Green
Rule Britannia!
The leader of our gang!
Five Chinese crackers up your bum
Go bang bang bang bang bang!



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THE RIFLES OF THE I.R.A.

In nineteen hundred and sixteen
The forces of the crown
For to take Orange, White, and Green
Bombarded Dublin Town
But in '21, Britannia's sons
Were forced earn their pay, when
The black and tans, like lightening ran
From the Rifles of the IRA!

They burned their way through Munster
Then laid Leinster on the rack
Through Connacht, and through Ulster
Marched the men in brown and black
They shot down wives and children
In their own heroic way, but
The black and tans, like lightening ran
From the Rifles of the IRA!

They hanged young Kevin Barry high
Just a lad of eighteen years
Cork City's flames lit up in the sky

But our brave lads new no fear
The Cork brigade with hand-grenades
In ambush wait and lay, and
The black and tans, like lightening ran
From the Rifles of the IRA!

The tans were got, taken out and shot
By a brave and valiant few
Sean Treacy, Dinny Lacey
And Tom Barry's gallant crew
Though we're not free yet
We won't forget
Until our dying day, how
The black and tans, like lightening ran
From the Rifles of the IRA!



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THE RISING OF THE MOON (1)

"Oh then tell me, Sean O'Farrell, tell me why you hurry so?"
"Hush me bouchal, hush and listen," and his face was all aglow
"I bear orders from the captain, get you ready quick and soon
With your pike upon your shoulder for the rising of the moon"

"Oh then tell me, Sean O'Farrell, where the gatherin' is to be?"
"Near the old spot by the river, right well known to you and me
One more word, for signal token whistle up the marching tune
For our pikes must be together by the rising of the moon"

Out from many a mud-walled cabin, eyes were lookin' through the night
Many a manly heart was throbin' for the blessed morning light
Murmurs ran along the valley like some banshee's mournful croon
And a thousand pikes were flashing by the rising of the moon

All along the shining river one black mass of men was seen
And above their shining weapons hung their own beloved green
Death to every foe and traitor! Forward, strike the marching tune
And hurrah me boys for freedom, it's the rising of the moon

Well they fought for dear old Ireland, and full bitter was their fate
Oh what glorious pride and sorrow fills the name of ninety-eight
But thank God e'en now are beating hearts in mankind's burning noon
Who will follow in their footsteps, at the rising of the moon



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THE RISING OF THE MOON (2)

"O then, tell me Sean O'Farrell, tell me why you hurry so"
"Hush, me Bouchall, hush and listen," and his cheeks were all aglow
I bear orders from the captain get you ready quick and soon
For the pikes must be together at the risin' of the moon

Chorus:
At the rising of the moon, oh the rising of the moon
For the pikes must be together at the rising of the moon

"O then, tell me Sean O'Farrell, where the gath'rin' is to be"
In the old spot by the river, right well known to you and me
One more word for signal token, whistle up the marchin' tune
With your pike upon your shoulder, by the rising of the moon"

Out from many a mud wall cabin eyes were watching through that night
Many a manly heart was throbbing for the blessed warning light
Murmurs passed along the valleys, like the banshee's lonely croon
And a thousand blades were flashing at the rising of the moon

There beside the singing river, that dark mass of men were seen
Far above the shining weapons hung their own beloved green
Death to every foe and traitor, forward, strike the marching tune
And hurrah, my boys, for freedom, tis the rising of the moon

Well, they fought for poor old Ireland, and full bitter was their fate
Oh what glorious pride and sorrow fills the name of ninety eight
Yes, thank God, e'en still are beating hearts in manhood's burning noon
Who would follow in their footsteps at the rising of the moon



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ROADS OF KILDARE

Johnny was born in a mansion down in the county of Clare
Rosie was born by a roadside somewhere in County Kildare
Destiny brought them together on the road to Killorglan one day
Neath her bright paisley shawl she was singing
And she stole his young heart away for she sang..

Chorus:
Meet me tonight by the campfire,come with me over the hill
Let us be married tomorrow, please let me whisper 'I will'
What if the neighbours are talking, who cares if your friends stop and stare
You'll be proud to be married to Rosie, who was reared on the roads of Kildare

Think of the parents who reared you, think of the family name
How can you marry a gypsy, Oh what a terrible shame
Parents and friends stop your pleading, don't worry about my affair
For I've fallen in love with a gypsy, who was reared on the roads of Kildare

Johnny went down from his mansion, just as the sun had gone down
Turning his back on his kinfolk, likewise his dear native town
Facing the roads of old Ireland with a gypsy he loved so sincere
When he came to the light of the campfire, these are the words he did hear:



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ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN

In the merry month of May from my home I started
Left the girls of Tuam - nearly broken-hearted
Saluted Father dear, kissed my darlin' Mother
Drank a pint of beer my grief and tears to smother
Then off to reap the corn, and leave where I was born
I cut a stout blackthorn to banish ghosts and goblins
In a bran' new pair of brogues I rattled o'er the bogs
And frightened all the dogs on the rocky road to Dublin

Chorus:
One, two, three, four five, hunt the hare and turn her
Down the rocky road, and all the ways to Dublin
Whack fol-lol-de-ra

In Mullingar that night I rested limbs so weary
Started by daylight next morning light and airy
Took a drop of the pure, to keep my heart from sinking
That's an Irishman's cure, whene'er he's on for drinking
To see the lasses smile, laughing all the while
At my curious style, 'twould set your heart a-bubbling
They ax'd if I was hired, the wages I required
Till I was almost tired of the rocky road to Dublin

In Dublin next arrived, I thought it such a pity
To be so soon deprived a view of that fine city
Then I took a stroll out among the quality
My bundle it was stole in a neat locality
Something crossed my mind, then I looked behind
No bundle could I find upon me stick a-wobblin'
Enquiring for the rogue, they said my Connacht brogue
Wasn't much in vogue on the rocky road to Dublin

From there I got away my spirits never failing
Landed on the quay as the ship was sailing
Captain at me roared, said that no room had he
When I jumped aboard, a cabin found for Paddy
Down among the pigs, I played some funny rigs
Danced some hearty jigs, the water round me bubblin'
When off to Holyhead I wished myself was dead
Or better far, instead, on the rocky road to Dublin

The boys of Liverpool, when we safely landed
Called myself a fool, I could no longer stand it
Blood began to boil, temper I was losin'
Poor old Erin's isle they began abusin'
"Hurrah my soul!" sez I, my shillelagh I let fly
Some Galway boys were by, saw I was a hobble in
Then with a loud Hurrah, they joined in the affray
We quickly cleared the way, for the rocky road to Dublin



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RODDY McCORLEY
(Ethna Carberry)

Oh, see the fleet-foot hosts of men who speed with faces wan
From farmstead and from thresher's cot along the banks of the Bann
They come with vengeance in their eyes too late, too late are they
For young Roddy McCorley goes to die on the bridge of Toome today

Up the narrow streets he stepped smiling proud and young
About the hemp rope around his neck his golden ringlets clung
Oh, there is never a tear in his blue eyes both sad and bright are they
As young Roddy McCorley goes to die on the bridge of Toome today

When he last stepped up that street his shining pike in hand
Behind him marched in grim array a stalwart earnest band
For Antrim town, for Antrim town, he led them to the fray
As young Roddy McCorley goes to die on the bridge of Toome today

There is never a one of all your dead, more bravely fell in fray
Than he who marches to his fate on the Bridge of Tomb today
True to the last! True to the last! He treads the upward way
As young Roddy McCorley goes to die on the bridge of Toome today



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RÓISIN DUBH

A Róisín, ná bíodh brón ort ná chás anois
tá do phárdún ó'n Róimh agus ó'n bPápa agat
tá na bráithre ag teacht thar
sáile agus ag tríall thar muir
'S ni ceilfear fíon Spáinneach ar mo Róisín Dubh

Tá grá agam i mo lár dhuit le blíain anois
grá cráite, grá cásmhar, grá ciapaithe
grá a d'fhág mé gan sláinte, gan rían, gan ruith
is go bráth, bráth, gan aon fháil a
leagadh ar mo Róisín Dubh

Beidh an Éirne ina tuilte dearga 's an spéir 'na fuil
beidh an saol ina choghadh craorach is réadfar chnoic
beidh gach gleann sléibhe ar fuid Éireann
agus móinte ar crith, la eigin
sula n-eagfaidh mo Róisín Dubh



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THE ROSE OF MOONCOIN

How sweet is to roam by the sunny Shure stream
And hear the doves coo 'neath the morning sunbeam
Where the thrush and the robin their sweet notes entwine
On the banks of the Shure that flows down by Mooncoin

Flow on, lovely river, flow gently along
By your waters so sweet sounds the lark's merry song
On your green banks I wander where first I did join
With you, lovely Molly, the rose of Mooncoin

Oh Molly, dear Molly, it breaks my fond heart
To know that we two forever must part
I'll think of you Molly while sun and moon shine
On the banks of the Shure that flows down by Mooncoin

Then here's to the Shure with its valley so fair
As oftimes we wandered in the cool morning air
Where the roses are blooming and lilies entwine
On the banks of the Shure that flows down by Mooncoin

Flow on, lovely river, flow gently along
By your waters so sweet sounds the lark's merry song
On your green banks I wander where first I did join
With you, lovely Molly, the rose of Mooncoin



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THE ROSE OF TRALEE

The pale moon was rising above the green mountain
The sun was declining beneath the blue sea
When I strayed with my love to the pure crystal fountain
That stands in beautiful vale of Tralee
She was lovely and fair as the rose of the summer
Yet, 'twas not her beauty alone that won me
Oh no! 'Twas the the truth in her eye ever beaming
That made me love Mary, the Rose of Tralee

The cool shades of evening their mantle were spreading
And Mary all smiling was listening to me
The moon through the valley her pale rays was shedding
When I won the heart of the Rose of Tralee
Though lovely and fair as the rose of the summer
Yet, 'twas not her beauty alone that won me
Oh no! 'Twas the the truth in her eye ever beaming
That made me love Mary, the Rose of Tralee



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ROSIN THE BEAU

I've traveled all over this world
And now to another I go
And I know that good quarters are waiting
To welcome old Rosin the Beau
To welcome old Rosin the Beau
To welcome old Rosin the Beau
And I know that good quarters are waiting
To welcome old Rosin the Beau

When I'm dead and laid out on the counter
A voice you will hear from below
Saying "Send down a hogshead of whiskey
To drink with old Rosin the Beau
To drink with old Rosin the Beau
To drink with old Rosin the Beau
Saying "Send down a hogshead of whiskey
To drink with old Rosin the Beau"

Then get a half dozen stout fellows
And stack them all up in a row
Let them drink out of half gallon bottles
To the memory of Rosin the Beau
To the memory of Rosin the Beau
To the memory of Rosin the Beau
Let them drink out of half gallon bottles
To the memory of Rosin the Beau

Then get this half dozen stout fellows
And let them all stagger and go
And dig a great hole in the meadow
And in it put Rosin the Beau
And in it put Rosin the Beau
And in it put Rosin the Beau
And dig a great hole in the meadow
And in it put Rosin the Beau

Then get ye a couple of bottles
Put one at me head and me toe
With a diamond ring scratch upon them
The name of old Rosin the Beau
The name of old Rosin the Beau
The name of old Rosin the Beau
With a diamond ring scratch upon them
The name of old Rosin the Beau

I've only this one consolation
As out of this world I go
I know that the next generation
Will resemble old Rosin the Beau
Will resemble old Rosin the Beau
Will resemble old Rosin the Beau
I know that the next generation
Will resemble old Rosin the Beau

I fear that old tyrant approaching
That cruel remorseless old foe
And I lift up me glass in his honor
Take a drink with old Rosin the Beau
Take a drink with old Rosin the Beau
Take a drink with old Rosin the Beau
And I lift up me glass in his honor
Take a drink with old Rosin the Beau



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